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Federal court rejects new Texas voter photo ID law

AUSTIN, Texas — A tough Texas law requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls discriminates against low-income blacks and Hispanics, a federal court ruled Thursday, wiping out for the November election a measure championed by conservatives and setting up a potential U.S. Supreme Court showdown.

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In Washington, a three-judge panel unanimously ruled that the 2011 law imposes "strict, unforgiving burdens on the poor" and noted that Texas' racial minorities are more likely to live in poverty.

The voter ID decision could set a precedent for upcoming legal challenges to similar laws in other states. South Carolina's strict photo ID law is on trial this week in front of another three-judge panel in the same federal courthouse

It also underscores a widespread push, largely by Republican-controlled legislatures and governors' offices, to impose strict identification requirements on voters. But Democrats say fraud at the polls is largely nonexistent and that Republicans are trying to disenfranchise minorities, poor people and college students — all groups that tend to vote Democratic.

State Attorney General Greg Abbott said he will appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court, "where we are confident we will prevail." He also told the Associated Press late Thursday that there is now definitely not enough time to salvage the law for the November election.

Federal court rejects new Texas voter photo ID law 08/30/12 [Last modified: Thursday, August 30, 2012 8:48pm]

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