Thursday, June 21, 2018

For many, Sandy's devastation persists

THE SCOPE: The storm, the deadliest and most destructive of the 2012 hurricane season, ripped a hole through the psyches and infrastructure of the Eastern Seaboard when it made landfall on Oct. 29 and struck hard in New Jersey, metropolitan New York and moved through New England.

At least 182 people died in the United States, millions were without power for days and in some areas, weeks. Gasoline shortages crunched rescue efforts and disrupted the supply of necessities such as food and water.

The federal government has already spent more than $14 billion in assistance to New York and New Jersey alone. At least $250 million has been spent on Sandy-related repair and recovery projects for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority region, which runs New York subways and buses.

Private funds have helped rebuild disaster areas from New Jersey's tourism boardwalks and beach communities to some of the estimated 300,000 homes that were destroyed or damaged.

THE METEOROLOGY: Hurricane Sandy grew to a Category 3 storm as it worked its way through the Caribbean. By Oct. 29, Sandy had moved ashore near Brigantine, N.J., just northeast of Atlantic City, as a post-tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds.

When it came ashore, it ran into other storm fronts coming in from the Midwest and down from Canada, a rare confluence that turned what would have been a bad hurricane into a disastrous superstorm. The severely energized storm affected parts of 24 states including the East Coast from Florida to Maine. It was a Category 1 hurricane covering an astounding 1.8 million square miles, according to NASA.

THE DAMAGE: Winds combined with incoming tides to flood low-lying areas and the famed tunnels of Manhattan, isolating the island from the rest of the city. A broad area south of 34th Street was cut off from transportation, and cellphone service failed.

In parts of Brooklyn and Queens, flooding forced electrical generators to fail, ending elevator service to high-rise buildings. Hospitals were evacuated, food and water was in short supply. Gasoline was rationed.

One of the iconic images of those days of nature's wrath was a fire that tore through Breezy Point, a popular place for many city workers, including firefighters. It is estimated that 350 homes, more than 10 percent of the area's houses, were destroyed by fire or flood and had to be demolished.

Today, more than a third of those homes remain unoccupied. Just six months ago, the area was 85 percent empty, officials told Newsday.

THE RECOVERY EFFORT: The rebuilding efforts remain huge. The National Climatic Data Center estimated the cost of Sandy at $65 billion, behind only Hurricane Katrina on the list of costliest disasters ever to hit the United States. Some people have used up their emergency benefits and are still seeking long-term housing. Whole communities from the Oakwood Beach area of Staten Island to Breezy Point, N.Y., to Long Beach on Long Island still need help despite hundreds of millions of dollars already spent — in some cases to buy out homeowners who stand no chance of rebuilding since land was washed into the sea.

Los Angeles Times

Comments
Charles Krauthammer, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and intellectual provocateur, dies at 68

Charles Krauthammer, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist and intellectual provocateur, dies at 68

Charles Krauthammer, a Pulitzer Prize-winning Washington Post columnist and intellectual provocateur who championed the muscular foreign policy of neoconservatism that helped lay the ideological groundwork for the 2003 U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, died...
Updated: 20 minutes ago
Kevin Knox to Knicks makes NBA history locally

Kevin Knox to Knicks makes NBA history locally

More than a year ago, Kevin Knox II stepped across the stage at the Straz Center to receive his high school diploma.On Thursday, the former Tampa Catholic standout was on basketball's biggest stage as he fulfilled his lifelong goal of playing in the ...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Trump jabbed first, and now world hits back in trade fight

Trump jabbed first, and now world hits back in trade fight

Trump got in the first jabs; now the world is punching back as trade brawl spreads
Updated: 1 hour ago

AP Top News at 10:30 p.m. EDT

AP Top News at 10:30 p.m. EDT
Updated: 1 hour ago
APNewsBreak: About 500 kids reunited with families since May

APNewsBreak: About 500 kids reunited with families since May

A senior Trump administration official says about 500 of the more than 2,000 children separated from their families at the border have been reunited since May
Updated: 1 hour ago
Trump jabbed first, and now world hits back in trade fight

Trump jabbed first, and now world hits back in trade fight

Trump got in the first jabs; now the world is punching back as trade brawl spreads
Updated: 1 hour ago
No. 1 Sun: Phoenix takes Ayton; Trae Young, Doncic swapped

No. 1 Sun: Phoenix takes Ayton; Trae Young, Doncic swapped

The Phoenix Suns have made Deandre Ayton the first No. 1 pick in franchise history
Updated: 1 hour ago
No. 1 Sun: Phoenix takes Ayton; Trae Young, Doncic swapped

No. 1 Sun: Phoenix takes Ayton; Trae Young, Doncic swapped

The Phoenix Suns have made Deandre Ayton the first No. 1 pick in franchise history
Updated: 1 hour ago
Rays journal: Jake Bauers proves hes up to speed on bases

Rays journal: Jake Bauers proves hes up to speed on bases

ST. PETERSBURG – Rookie 1B Jake Bauers has impressed at the plate and in the field since his June 7 promotion.Also, with his hustling on the bases."I knew he played hard; everybody said that at every level,'' manager Kevin Cash said. "I di...
Updated: 2 hours ago
Jameis Winston suspension means Bucs will turn to Ryan Fitzpatrick at QB

Jameis Winston suspension means Bucs will turn to Ryan Fitzpatrick at QB

The news of Jameis Winston's suspension to start the upcoming season likely means that the Bucs will have veteran Ryan Fitzpatrick stepping in at quarterback for three crucial games.Fitzpatrick stepped in as a starter for three games last year when W...
Updated: 2 hours ago