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GlaxoSmithKline fined $3 billion for marketing ploys

WASHINGTON — Glaxo­SmithKline LLC will pay $3 billion and plead guilty to promoting two popular drugs for unapproved uses and to failing to disclose important safety information on a third in the largest health care fraud settlement in U.S. history, the Justice Department said Monday.

Accompanying the criminal case was a civil settlement in which the government said the company's improper marketing included providing doctors with expensive resort vacations, European hunting trips, high-paid speaking tours and even tickets to a Madonna concert.

The $3 billion combined criminal-civil fine will be the largest penalty ever paid by a drug company, Deputy Attorney General James M. Cole said.

"Let me be clear, we will not tolerate health care fraud," Cole told a news conference at the Justice Department. He would not say whether any company executives were under investigation. The company's guilty plea and sentence have to be approved by a federal court in Massachusetts.

GlaxoSmithKline CEO Sir Andrew Witty expressed regret and said they have learned "from the mistakes that were made."

"Today brings to resolution difficult, long-standing matters for GSK," he said in a statement. "Whilst these originate in a different era for the company, they cannot and will not be ignored."

Crimes and civil violations like those in the GlaxoSmithKline case have been widespread in the pharmaceutical industry. Some have said the industry regards the fines as simply a cost of doing business because aggressively promoting drugs to doctors for uses not officially approved has quickly turned numerous drugs from mediocre sellers into blockbusters, with more than $1 billion in annual sales.

The prior record-setting case involved Pfizer Inc., the world's biggest drugmaker. Pfizer paid the government $2.3 billion in criminal and civil fines for improperly marketing 13 different drugs, including Viagra and cholesterol fighter Lipitor.

It is illegal to promote uses for a drug that have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration — a practice known as off-label marketing.

Prosecutors said GlaxoSmithKline illegally promoted the drug Paxil for treating depression in children from April 1998 to August 2003, even though the FDA never approved it for anyone under age 18. The corporation also promoted the drug Wellbutrin from January 1999 to December 2003 for weight loss, the treatment of sexual dysfunction, substance addictions and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, although it was only approved for treatment of major depressive disorder.

Justice Department officials also said that between 2001 and 2007 GlaxoSmithKline failed to report to the FDA on safety data from certain post-marketing studies and from two studies of the cardiovascular safety of the diabetes drug Avandia. Since 2007, the FDA has added warnings to the Avandia label to alert doctors about potential increased risk of congestive heart failure and heart attack.

GlaxoSmithKline fined $3 billion for marketing ploys 07/02/12 [Last modified: Monday, July 2, 2012 10:36pm]

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