Saturday, January 20, 2018

Growers struggle with shortage of workers

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Kevin Steward has spent more than a quarter-century in agriculture, much of that growing grapes for wineries. He's always been able to rely on seasonal workers to tend the vines and bring in the year's harvest.

But this year, workers are harder to come by.

"I could use 30 men," Steward said. "We'll get 'er done, but I can't find anybody."

Growers throughout California's fertile Central Valley are wringing their hands as they struggle to find the manpower they need.

Anti-immigration laws and policies, an aging population, and even a raging drug war south of the border all are contributing to a slowdown in the pipeline of Mexican workers that for so long have fueled the farm industry, experts say.

"We're just not seeing the number of people we (usually) see this time of year," said Bryan Little, director of farm labor affairs at the California Farm Bureau Federation.

Steward, president of the Sacramento County Farm Bureau, said he has only a fraction of the 40 workers he depends on to tend the 1,000 acres of vineyards he manages in California's Amador and San Joaquin counties.

"I've never seen it this bad," he said, though he's heard that there are "a lot of good workers who are busy picking cherries."

But cherry growers say their labor situation is only marginally better.

"I hope what we've seen is an aberration," Bruce Blodgett, executive director of the San Joaquin County Farm Bureau, said of the labor shortage.

California growers hope so, too. Early crops such as asparagus, blueberries and cherries are in, but soon will come more stone fruit, strawberries and the salad bowl crops — carrots, lettuce, mushrooms and peppers. All of them are crops that need hands in the soil.

California Farm Bureau officials say that as many as 225,000 workers toil on the state's farmland, a number that typically grows to about 450,000 by the heavy harvest season in September.

Farm labor contractors saw warning signs as early as last year's grape harvest when a late season stretched the labor supply to the limit, said Guadalupe Sandoval, managing director of the Sacramento-based California Farm Labor Contractor Association.

"Things didn't ripen until late so everybody needed workers at the same time," Sandoval said. "There weren't enough crews out there. That was our canary in the coal mine."

Reasons for the halt on Mexican immigrant labor are many.

Prices asked by the "coyotes" who smuggle workers across the border continue to rise — as high as $7,500, Sandoval is told. And, he said, "There's no guarantee of getting across. The coyotes may take your money. Maybe your life, as well."

The narco-terrorism plaguing Mexico makes an already treacherous journey north even more perilous.

Jeff Passel, a senior demographer at the Pew Hispanic Center in Washington, D.C., said surveys tracking the Mexican labor force "show a huge drop in the number of people setting out from Mexico. It's not surprising that that's having an effect on agriculture."

"There's a lot of factors feeding into this," Passel continued. "We're looking at a severely reduced demand for unauthorized immigrants, increased enforcement and a ramp-up in violence that makes it more dangerous to get to the border."

Mexico's demographics are changing, too, said Little, of the California Farm Bureau Federation.

Families are getting smaller and the population is aging, shrinking the number of workers crossing the border to follow the crops, Little said.

"That gigantic overlay of young people in the 1970s and 1980s — it just isn't there anymore," he said.

It's not clear if farm labor shortages will continue, or what can be done to change the situation. Lawmakers have battled for years about various immigration reform strategies, including the guest-worker programs favored by many in the agricultural industry.

But Chuck Dudley, president of the Yolo County Farm Bureau, said the implications for American food consumers are severe if shortages worsen.

"It boils down to the fact that if labor continues as it is now, the ability to get a wide variety of food to table is somewhat in jeopardy," Dudley said. "If you don't get it planted, picked and packed, it won't get to the table."

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