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Guardians of the torch

A police officer tackles a demonstrator during the Olympic torch relay Sunday in London. The security agents wear tracksuits, but a military bearing hints at their true pedigree: They are members of China’s paramilitary police force.

Associated Press

A police officer tackles a demonstrator during the Olympic torch relay Sunday in London. The security agents wear tracksuits, but a military bearing hints at their true pedigree: They are members of China’s paramilitary police force.

BEIJING — They wear bright blue tracksuits and Beijing Olympic organizers call them "flame attendants." But a military bearing hints at their true pedigree: paramilitary police sent by Beijing to guard the Olympic flame during its journey around the world.

Torchbearers have criticized the security detail for aggressive behavior, and a top London Olympics official simply called them "thugs."

"They were barking orders at me, like 'Run! Stop! This! That!' and I was like, 'Oh my gosh, who are these people?' " former television host Konnie Huq told British Broadcasting Corp. radio about her encounter with the men in blue during London's leg of the relay Sunday.

Members of the "29th Olympic Games Torch Relay Flame Protection Unit" were picked from special units of the People's Armed Police, China's internal security force. The requirements for the job: to be "tall, handsome, mighty, in exceptional physical condition similar to that of professional athletes," the state-run China News Service said.

The training for the Olympic flame detail included daily mountain runs of at least 6 miles and lessons in protocol. They also learned basic commands such as "go," "step back," "speed up" and "slow down" in English, French, German, Spanish and Japanese.

At least one torchbearer said she clashed with the squad, and others have criticized their heavy-handed tactics.

Yolaine De La Bigne, a French environmental journalist who was a torchbearer in Paris, told the Associated Press she tried to wear a headband with a Tibetan flag, but the Chinese agents ripped it away from her. "It was seen and then, after four seconds, all the Chinese security pounced on me. There were at least five or six (of them). They started to get angry" and shouted "No! No! No!" in English, she said.

Sebastian Coe, chairman of the London 2012 Games, was even more blunt.

"They tried to push me out of the way three times. They are horrible. They did not speak English. They were thugs," Coe, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, was quoted as saying in British media. A spokeswoman for the London 2012 Olympics committee confirmed that Coe was quoted accurately, but added that he thought he was making private comments.

Security fears

in San Francisco

The Olympic torch arrived in San Francisco for its only North American stop amid heavy security Tuesday, a day after activists scaled the Golden Gate Bridge to protest China's human rights record. International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge has voiced concerns about today's 6-mile relay. The flame arrived in San Francisco shortly before 4 a.m. and was immediately put in a vehicle to be whisked away to a secret location, San Francisco Olympic Torch Relay Committee spokesman David Perry said.

Guardians of the torch 04/08/08 [Last modified: Thursday, October 28, 2010 10:25am]
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