Hundreds celebrate rare white bison at Conn. farm

Native Americans named the white bison calf, left, Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. Some consider the birth a sacred event.

Associated Press

Native Americans named the white bison calf, left, Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy. Some consider the birth a sacred event.

GOSHEN, Conn. — Dozens of Native Americans wore the traditional garb of their ancestors, sang songs and beat drums on a western Connecticut farm Saturday in celebration of the birth of one of the world's rarest animals — a white bison.

The miracle calf was officially named Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy at the elaborate ceremony at the Mohawk Bison farm in Goshen in the state's northwestern hills. It was born June 16 at the farm of fourth-generation farmer Peter Fay.

Many Native Americans consider white bison a symbol of hope and unity; some consider their births sacred events. Experts say white bison are as rare as one in 10 million.

Yellow Medicine Dancing Boy is not an albino, and Fay said DNA testing confirmed the animal's bloodlines are pure and there was no intermingling with cattle.

Lakota tribe members from South Dakota were among the hundreds of people who gathered at the celebration. Other tribal elders from the Mohawk, Seneca and Cayuga tribes participated. Crowds patiently waited by the roadside before slowly marching into the pasture and lining up alongside a fence to witness the ceremony.

Hundreds celebrate rare white bison at Conn. farm 07/28/12 [Last modified: Saturday, July 28, 2012 9:51pm]

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