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970465 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2009-01-26 02:21:07.0 UTC 2009-01-25T21:21:07.000-05:00 illinois-governor-prepares-to-boycott-his-impeachment-trial Published 2011-11-07 21:48:24.0 UTC 2011-11-07T16:48:24.000-05:00 incoming DTI 47223011 SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — If there's such a thing as a "normal" impeachment trial, the one that starts today in Illinois doesn't qualify. The defendant, Gov. Rod Blagojevich, won't participate. And while the Democrat acknowledges his conviction is certain, he refuses to resign. Blagojevich, 52, complains that the trial rules are unfair, but he and his lawyers didn't try to influence the rules as they were written or afterward. After weeks of near silence, Blagojevich has begun an energetic public relations campaign, comparing himself to the hero of a Frank Capra movie and a cowboy being lynched for a crime he didn't commit. He said that when he was arrested on federal corruption charges, he took solace from other leaders who have been jailed. "I thought about Mandela, Dr. King, Gandhi" and that helped him gain perspective, he said in an interview that aired Sunday on Today. The full interview will air today, the same day the impeachment trial starts and Blagojevich is scheduled to appear on Good Morning, America, The View and Larry King Live. Legal experts see little benefit to Blagojevich from boycotting the trial while refusing to resign. The decision means he'll still be leaving office soon, but only after proceedings guaranteed to put him in a bad light. Senators, and thus the public, will hear details of the criminal charges against Blagojevich. They're likely to hear recordings that allegedly reveal the governor talking about signing legislation in exchange for campaign contributions. And in addition to simply removing Blagojevich, the Senate could vote to bar him from ever again holding public office in Illinois. By CHRISTOPHER WILLS, Associated Press Writer Illinois governor prepares to boycott his impeachment trial By CHRISTOPHER WILLS Associated 4STA A Section dj7jf1nrk97f dj7jf Illinois governor prepares to boycott his impeachment trial AP WASHINGTON 3 ILLGOV012609 Illinois governor prepares to boycott his impeachment trial 2009-01-26 05:00:00.0 UTC 2009-01-26T00:00:00.000-05:00 false templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2009/01/25/47223011-illinois-governor-prepares-to-boycott-his-impeachment-trial StaffArticle 2012-12-23 19:58:48.0 UTC 2012-12-23T14:58:48.000-05:00 SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — If there's such a thing as a "normal" impeachment trial, the one that starts today in Illinois doesn't qualify.<span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">CHRISTOPHER WILLS</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Associated Press Writer 2278982 2016-05-26 00:52:34.0 UTC 3 Months Ago what-putting-bill-cosby-on-trial-can-and-cant-do incoming What putting Bill Cosby on trial can— and can't— do StaffArticle 2263062 2016-01-27 22:25:09.0 UTC 7 Months Ago nighttime-battle-zone-his-bedtime-is-not-hers incoming Nighttime battle zone: His bedtime is not hers StaffArticle 2261779 2016-01-18 21:28:31.0 UTC 7 Months Ago this-is-how-sanders-would-pay-for-his-health-plan incoming This is how Sanders would pay for his health plan StaffArticle <p>SPRINGFIELD, Ill. — If there's such a thing as a &quot;normal&quot; impeachment trial, the one that starts today in Illinois doesn't qualify.</p> <p>The defendant, Gov. Rod Blagojevich, won't participate. And while the Democrat acknowledges his conviction is certain, he refuses to resign.</p> <p>Blagojevich, 52, complains that the trial rules are unfair, but he and his lawyers didn't try to influence the rules as they were written or afterward.</p> <p>After weeks of near silence, Blagojevich has begun an energetic public relations campaign, comparing himself to the hero of a Frank Capra movie and a cowboy being lynched for a crime he didn't commit. He said that when he was arrested on federal corruption charges, he took solace from other leaders who have been jailed.</p> <p>&quot;I thought about Mandela, Dr. King, Gandhi&quot; and that helped him gain perspective, he said in an interview that aired Sunday on Today.</p> <p>The full interview will air today, the same day the impeachment trial starts and Blagojevich is scheduled to appear on Good Morning, America, The View and Larry King Live.</p> <p>Legal experts see little benefit to Blagojevich from boycotting the trial while refusing to resign. The decision means he'll still be leaving office soon, but only after proceedings guaranteed to put him in a bad light.</p> <p>Senators, and thus the public, will hear details of the criminal charges against Blagojevich. They're likely to hear recordings that allegedly reveal the governor talking about signing legislation in exchange for campaign contributions. And in addition to simply removing Blagojevich, the Senate could vote to bar him from ever again holding public office in Illinois.</p>trueruntime2016-08-30 05:31:59