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Kerry pays homage in Kiev

In a somber show of U.S. support for Ukraine’s new leadership Tuesday, Secretary of State John Kerry walked the streets of Kiev where more than 80 anti-government protesters were killed last month. Kerry met with the new Ukrainian government’s acting president, prime minister, foreign minister and top parliamentary officials. Kerry went to Institutska Street, where he placed a bouquet of red roses. Twice, the Roman Catholic secretary of state made the sign of the cross at a shrine for protesters killed during mid-February riots. “We’re concerned very much. We hope for your help, we hope for your assistance,” a woman shouted as he walked down a misty street lined with remnants of barricades. “We will be helping,” Kerry said. “We are helping. President Obama is planning more assistance.”

Associated Press

In a somber show of U.S. support for Ukraine’s new leadership Tuesday, Secretary of State John Kerry walked the streets of Kiev where more than 80 anti-government protesters were killed last month. Kerry met with the new Ukrainian government’s acting president, prime minister, foreign minister and top parliamentary officials. Kerry went to Institutska Street, where he placed a bouquet of red roses. Twice, the Roman Catholic secretary of state made the sign of the cross at a shrine for protesters killed during mid-February riots. “We’re concerned very much. We hope for your help, we hope for your assistance,” a woman shouted as he walked down a misty street lined with remnants of barricades. “We will be helping,” Kerry said. “We are helping. President Obama is planning more assistance.”

KIEV, Ukraine — In a somber show of U.S. support for Ukraine's new leadership, Secretary of State John Kerry walked the streets Tuesday where more than 80 anti-government protesters were killed last month, and promised beseeching crowds that American aid is on the way.

Kerry met in Ukraine with the new government's acting president, prime minister, foreign minister and top parliamentary officials. Speaking to reporters afterward, Kerry urged Russian President Vladimir Putin to stand down and said the United States is looking for ways to de-escalate the mounting tensions.

"It is clear that Russia has been working hard to create a pretext for being able to invade further," Kerry said. "It is not appropriate to invade a country, and at the end of a barrel of a gun dictate what you are trying to achieve. That is not 21st-century, G-8, major nation behavior."

Kerry made a pointed distinction between the Ukrainian government and Putin's.

"The contrast really could not be clearer: determined Ukrainians demonstrating strength through unity, and the Russian government out of excuses, hiding its hand behind falsehoods, intimidation and provocations. In the hearts of Ukrainians and the eyes of the world, there is nothing strong about what Russia is doing."

He said the penalties against Russia are "not something we are seeking to do, it is something Russia is pushing us to do."

President Barack Obama, visiting a Washington, D.C., school to highlight his new budget, said his administration's push to punish Putin put the U.S. on "the side of history that, I think, more and more people around the world deeply believe in, the principle that a sovereign people, an independent people, are able to make their own decisions about their own lives. And, you know, Mr. Putin can throw a lot of words out there, but the facts on the ground indicate that right now he is not abiding by that principle."

Kerry headed straight to Institutska Street at the start of an hourslong visit intended to bolster the new government that took over just a week ago when Ukraine President Viktor Yanukovych fled. Kerry placed a bouquet of red roses, and twice the Roman Catholic secretary of state made the sign of the cross at a shrine set up to memorialize protesters who were killed during mid-February riots.

"We're concerned very much. We hope for your help, we hope for your assistance," a woman shouted as Kerry walked down a misty street lined with tires, plywood, barbed wire and other remnants of the barricades that protesters had stood up to try to keep Yanukovych's forces from reaching nearby Maidan Square, the heart of the demonstrations.

Piles of flowers brought in honor of the dead provided splashes of color in an otherwise drab day that was still tinged with the smell of smoke.

"We will be helping," Kerry said. "We are helping. President Obama is planning more assistance."

Tuesday's developments

RUSSIA: President Vladimir Putin said in a news conference that Russia has no intention "to fight the Ukrainian people" but reserves the right to use force.

WASHINGTON: The Obama administration announced a $1 billion energy subsidy package for Ukraine and economic sanctions against Russia amid worries that Moscow was ready to stretch its military reach further into the mainland of the former Soviet republic.

CRIMEA: Russian troops, who had taken control of the Belbek air base, fired warning shots into the air as some 300 Ukrainian soldiers, who previously staffed the airfield, demanded their jobs back.

MARKETS: World markets regained a large chunk of Monday's losses on signs that Russia was backpedaling. Gold, the Japanese yen and U.S. treasuries — all seen as safe havens — returned some of their gains. Russia's RTS index, which fell 12 percent on Monday, rose 6.2 percent Tuesday. In the U.S., the Dow Jones industrial average closed up 1.4 percent.

Kerry pays homage in Kiev 03/04/14 [Last modified: Tuesday, March 4, 2014 11:24pm]
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