Lawmakers urge special torture inquiry

WASHINGTON — Nearly 60 House Democrats Saturday urged the Justice Department to appoint a special counsel to examine whether top Bush administration officials may have committed crimes in authorizing the use of harsh interrogation tactics against suspected terrorists.

In a letter to Attorney General Michael Mukasey, the lawmakers cited what they said is "mounting evidence" that senior officials personally sanctioned the use of waterboarding and other aggressive tactics against detainees in U.S.-run prisons overseas. An independent investigation is needed to determine whether such actions violated U.S or international law, the letter stated.

"This information indicates that the Bush administration may have systematically implemented, from the top down, detainee interrogation policies that constitute torture or otherwise violate the law," it said. The letter was signed by 56 House Democrats, including House Judiciary Committee Chairman John Conyers Jr., D-Mich., and House Intelligence Committee members Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., and Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y.

The request was prompted in part by new disclosures of high-level discussions within the Bush administration that reportedly focused on specific interrogation practices. Some of the new detail was contained in a report last month by the Justice Department's inspector general, which described a series of White House meetings in which the controversial tactics were vigorously debated.

Conyers, who called the detainee controversy "a truly shameful episode" in U.S. history, said "because these apparent 'enhanced interrogation techniques' were used under cover of Justice Department legal opinions, the need for an outside special prosecutor is obvious."

The House letter suggested a broad inquiry that would examine the consequences of administration decisions at U.S. detention sites in Iraq; at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba; and in former secret prisons operated by the CIA. The letter said interrogation policies had resulted in "abuse, sexual exploitation and torture" that may have violated the War Crimes Act of 1996 and the American Anti-Torture Act of 2007.

"Despite the seriousness of the evidence, the Justice Department has brought prosecution against only one civilian for an interrogation-related crime," the letter states. "Given that record, we believe it is necessary to appoint a special counsel in order to ensure that a thorough and impartial investigation occurs."

Numerous human rights groups have been calling for such an investigation for several years.

Detainee's attorney alleges abuse

Air Force Maj. David Frakt, military defense attorney for Mohammed Jawad, a detainee held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has asked that all charges against his client be dismissed after prosecutors provided him documents that show Jawad was subjected to a sleep deprivation technique that had been banned at the facility, calling the treatment a violation of the law of war and U.S. laws and policies.

Washington Post

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Detainee's lawyer claims torture

Air Force Maj. David Frakt, military defense attorney for Mohammed Jawad, a detainee at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, has asked that all charges against his client be dismissed after prosecutors provided him documents that show Jawad was subjected to a sleep deprivation technique that had been banned at the facility. Frakt called the treatment a violation of the law of war and U.S. laws and policies.

Washington Post

Lawmakers urge special torture inquiry 06/07/08 [Last modified: Monday, November 1, 2010 10:50am]

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