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Major snow storm in Plains, Midwest expected to get worse

A pedestrian makes his way across the road in Sioux City, Iowa, as heavy snow began falling on Wednesday. The storm is expected to intensify today as it continues to move north and east.

Associated Press

A pedestrian makes his way across the road in Sioux City, Iowa, as heavy snow began falling on Wednesday. The storm is expected to intensify today as it continues to move north and east.

OMAHA, Neb. — Holiday travelers battled icy roads and flight cancellations and delays on Wednesday as a major winter storm began to spread across much of the nation's midsection — and the worst of the weather was still expected to come.

The slow-moving storm was likely to intensify today as it continued its trek north and east, bringing heavy snow, sleet and rain to a large swath of the Plains and the Midwest. A foot or two of snow was possible in some areas by Christmas Day.

"It's an usually large storm, even for the Plains," said Scott Whitmore, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Topeka, Kan.

In northwest Kansas, snow started falling before sunrise Wednesday after freezing rain had already iced up roads. Part of Gove County saw 8 inches of snow, though it was far lighter elsewhere, said Albert Pietrycha, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Goodland.

A stretch of Interstate 70 in western Kansas was snowpacked by midafternoon, although it wasn't closed — yet. The state Department of Transportation warned that travel would be almost impossible in northeast Kansas by afternoon today.

The storm began in the southwest — where blizzard-like conditions shut down roads and caused a pileup involving 20 vehicles in Arizona on Tuesday — and spread east and north, prompting weather advisories from the Rocky Mountains to Lake Michigan and part of the Four Corners region.

In Colorado, numerous minor accidents prompted state transportation officials to close a section of Interstate 25 from Wellington, Colo., to Cheyenne, Wyo., for several hours.

Parts of Nebraska were coated with ice that was up to ¼-inch thick, and a number of churches were already canceling Christmas Eve services in anticipation of more ice and snow. But residents were still waiting for a blizzard.

"It isn't nearly as bad as they said it would be," said jewelry-store owner Stan Soper of Ord, a town of about 2,300 in north-central Nebraska.

Slippery roads were blamed for at least six deaths — three in accidents on Interstate 80 in Nebraska, two in a crash on Interstate 70 in Kansas and one near Albuquerque, N.M. South of Phoenix, a dust storm set off a series of collisions that killed at least three people Tuesday.

In Chicago, more than 200 flights at O'Hare International Airport were canceled, along with about 60 flights out of Midway International Airport, the city's Aviation Department said.

The winter blast follows a weekend storm that dropped record snowfall and interrupted holiday shopping and travel on the East Coast. Tens of thousands of customers in West Virginia and Virginia remained without power Wednesday.

Train electrical problems derail plans

An electrical malfunction outside New York City brought train service to a standstill Wednesday and spotlighted problems on Amtrak's northeast corridor that persist despite a long-term effort to upgrade its aging power supply system. Trains from Boston to Washington were delayed for about three hours after a low voltage reading was detected near a substation in North Bergen, N.J., where trains go under the Hudson River en route to Manhattan. Thousands of commuters and holiday travelers were stranded or left scrambling for alternative transportation. Service was restored at about 11:30 a.m., and trains were running at or close to schedule by about 4 p.m.

Major snow storm in Plains, Midwest expected to get worse 12/23/09 [Last modified: Wednesday, December 23, 2009 10:45pm]
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