Thursday, December 14, 2017

Militant attack on Yemeni intelligence headquarters kills 20

SANAA, Yemen — The death toll of a suspected al-Qaida attack on a Yemeni intelligence headquarters rose to 20 on Saturday, in the worst such attack in a year that highlights the challenges faced by the country's new leadership as it struggles to bring security and reconcile a military with split loyalties.

The attack, in the heart of the port city of Aden, underscored al-Qaida's ability to launch deadly strikes despite a two-month Yemeni military offensive backed by the U.S. that earlier this year dislodged militants who had taken over a string of southern towns near Aden.

In a coordinated attack, two groups of masked militants stormed the intelligence building from two sides, firing automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades, according to intelligence officials in the city and witnesses from the adjacent state TV and radio building.

While one group clashed with guards of the intelligence building's main gate, a second threw a bomb at a small mosque, killing soldiers who were resting and sleeping inside, officials said. The gunmen then sprayed their victims with bullets before detonating a car bomb in front of the intelligence building, collapsing its facade.

Witnesses said they saw gunmen open fire on three soldiers at a front gate, killing them before launching rocket-propelled grenades at the building and mistakenly hitting the television offices. Two female reporters were critically wounded, witnesses said.

By the end of the day, 20 were dead. All were military and security men except for one civilian, while six other civilians were injured aside from the reporters.

The same intelligence building had come under attack in 2010 by al-Qaida. Saturday's attack, which took nearly 45 minutes, carries the fingerprints of the group, a security official said.

Officials and the witnesses, who are government employees, spoke to the Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the press.

The United States considers al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula as the terror network's most dangerous offshoot, held responsible for several failed attacks on U.S. territory.

Al-Qaida-linked militants took advantage of political turmoil in Yemen to overrun several major towns in Abyan province, neighboring Aden. They held many of them for months until the military drove them out of most areas since the offensive started in May, including the Abyan provincial capital of Zinjibar and the nearby town of Jaar. More than 100,000 people fled the violence there, with many taking refuge in makeshift shelters and schools in Aden.

Many of the militants escaped into nearby mountains, however, and have continued to carry out attacks. Suicide bombings and assassinations have targeted top officials in Aden tasked with fighting al-Qaida. An al-Qaida front group, Ansar al-Shariah, was behind the kidnapping of a Saudi Arabian diplomat in the port of Aden in March.

Yemen's Interior Ministry warned of possible attacks during the four-day Muslim holiday Eid al-Fitr, which comes as the holy month of Ramadan ends this weekend. Analysts say the attack underscores the fragile nature of the new political leadership as it struggles to impose law and order and restore the country's security as state institutions maintain split loyalties. President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi still faces a challenge from ousted authoritarian ruler Ali Abdullah Saleh, they say.

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