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New study tells students the worth of their majors

An old joke in academia gets at the precarious economics of majoring in the humanities.

The scientist asks, "Why does it work?"

The engineer asks, "How does it work?"

The English major asks, "Would you like fries with that?"

But exactly what an English major makes in a lifetime has never been clear, and some defenders of the humanities have said that their students are endowed with "critical thinking" and other skills that could enable them to catch up to other students in earnings.

Turns out, on average, they were wrong.

Over a lifetime, the earnings of workers who have majored in engineering, computer science or business are as much as 50 percent higher than the earnings of those who major in the humanities, the arts, education and psychology, according to the analysis by researchers at Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce.

"I don't want to slight Shakespeare," said Anthony Carnevale, one of the report's authors. "But this study slights Shakespeare."

The report is based on previously unreported census data that definitively links college majors to career earnings.

According to the study, the median annual earnings for someone with a bachelor's degree in engineering was $75,000. It was $47,000 in the humanities, $44,000 in the arts and $42,000 in education or in psychology.

The individual major with the highest median earnings was petroleum engineering, at $120,000, followed by pharmaceutical sciences at $105,000, and math and computer sciences at $98,000.

The lowest earnings median was for those majoring in counseling or psychology, at $29,000, and early childhood education at $36,000. Workers with a bachelor's degree in English language and literature, the most popular major within the humanities, have median earnings of $48,000.

These figures do not include workers who went on to complete advanced degrees.

New study tells students the worth of their majors 05/23/11 [Last modified: Monday, May 23, 2011 11:50pm]
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