Overcast60° FULL FORECASTOvercast60° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

New U.S. satellite to monitor debris in Earth orbit

The Space-Based Space Surveillance satellite is a $500 million spacecraft that will provide the first full-time, space-based eye on thousands of other satellites and pieces of debris.

Associated Press (2009)

The Space-Based Space Surveillance satellite is a $500 million spacecraft that will provide the first full-time, space-based eye on thousands of other satellites and pieces of debris.

DENVER — A new U.S. Air Force satellite will provide the first full-time, space-based surveillance of hundreds of satellites and thousands of pieces of debris that could crash into American and allied assets circling the Earth.

If all goes as planned, the Space-Based Space Surveillance satellite, scheduled for a Thursday launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., will have an unobstructed, round-the-clock view of the increasingly heavy traffic in Earth orbit — something the Air Force doesn't have now.

Currently, the Air Force relies on a ground-based network of radar and optical telescopes around the globe to monitor about 1,000 active satellites and 20,000 pieces of debris. The telescopes can be used only on clear nights, and not all radar stations are powerful enough to detect satellites in deep space orbit, about 22,000 miles from Earth.

From its orbit about 390 miles above the Earth, the new satellite will have a clear view of deep space, unaffected by daylight or weather.

"It really has tremendous capabilities," said Todd Citron, director of advanced space and intelligence systems for Boeing Co., prime contractor for the satellite, known as SBSS.

Citron said SBSS will revolutionize "space situational awareness," the military term for knowing not only where the objects are, but where they're headed and what might be in their path.

An Air Force official was more cautious.

"We do know that the sensor is going to provide a lot of capability," said Col. J.R. Jordan, mission director for the SBSS launch and vice commander of the Air Force Space Superiority Systems Wing. "We haven't really come up with broad statements" about how much SBSS is expected to improve monitoring, Jordan said.

SBSS was built by Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. in Boulder, Colo., working with Boeing.

Past collisions

Space junk has collided with satellites at least twice. In 1996, a French satellite was damaged by a rocket fragment. In 2009, a satellite owned by Iridium Communications of Bethesda, Md., was destroyed in a collision with a derelict Russian satellite.

fast facts

Past collisions

Space junk has collided with satellites at least twice. In 1996, a French satellite was damaged by a rocket fragment. In 2009, a satellite owned by Iridium Communications of Bethesda, Md., was destroyed in a collision with a derelict Russian satellite.

New U.S. satellite to monitor debris in Earth orbit 07/03/10 [Last modified: Saturday, July 3, 2010 9:56pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...