Saturday, April 21, 2018

Obama targets coal-fired plants

The Obama administration on Monday announced one of the strongest actions ever taken by the U.S. government to fight climate change, a proposed Environmental Protection Agency regulation to cut carbon pollution from the nation's power plants 30 percent from 2005 levels by 2030.

The regulation takes aim at the largest source of carbon pollution in the United States, the nation's 600 coal-fired power plants. If it withstands an expected onslaught of legal and legislative attacks, experts say that it could close hundreds of the plants and also lead, over the course of decades, to systemic changes in the U.S. electricity industry, including transformations in how power is generated and used.

Gina McCarthy, the EPA administrator, unveiled the proposal in a speech Monday. "Today, climate change — fueled by carbon pollution — supercharges risks not just to our health, but to our communities, our economy, and our way of life," she said.

President Obama, who failed to push a sweeping climate change bill through Congress in his first term, is now acting on his own by using his executive authority under the 1970 Clean Air Act to issue the regulation.

Under the rule, states will be given a wide menu of policy options to achieve the pollution cuts. Rather than immediately shutting down coal plants, states would be allowed to reduce emissions by making changes across their electricity systems by installing wind and solar generation or energy-efficiency technology, and by starting or joining state and regional "cap and trade" programs, in which states agree to cap carbon pollution and buy and sell permits to pollute.

McCarthy said that the proposal will help the economy, not hurt it: "For over four decades, EPA has cut air pollution by 70 percent and the economy has more than tripled. Climate action doesn't dull America's competitive edge — it sharpens it. It spurs ingenuity and innovation."

The EPA forecasts that the rule will prevent 2,700 to 6,600 premature deaths and 140,000 to 150,000 asthma attacks. There is no link between carbon pollution and asthma, but the EPA estimates that future coal plant closures will lead to a 25 percent reduction in traditional air pollutants like soot, sulfur and nitrogen, which are linked to respiratory diseases.

Comments

Sundayís sports on TV/radio

TODAYAutosNHRA: SpringNationals2 p.m.FS1IndyCar: Grand Prix of Alabama3 p.m.NBCSNBaseballTwins at Rays1 p.m.Fox Sun; 620-AMMarlins at Brewers2 p.m.FSFIndians at Orioles2 p.m.MLBCubs at Rockies (in progress)4 p.m.MLBNationals at Dodgers8 p.m.ESPNColle...
Updated: 14 minutes ago
Marc Topkinís takeaways from Raysí 10-1 Saturday win over Twins

Marc Topkinís takeaways from Raysí 10-1 Saturday win over Twins

* Is it time to take the leap and believe this is the real Blake Snell? He talked a good game this spring and pitched well in his debut, but that rough second outing raised old doubts. But a good outing in Chicago and two dominant ones on the homesta...
Updated: 23 minutes ago
Yankees give top prospect Gleyber Torres a shot in majors

Yankees give top prospect Gleyber Torres a shot in majors

Gleyber Torres cannot help an erratic staff of starting pitchers. Nor can he help shake Giancarlo Stanton from his April funk. But the Yankees hope that calling up Torres from Triple A on Saturday will provide a jolt before they fall much farther beh...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Georgi Hristovís 57th goal ties Rowdies team record

Georgi Hristovís 57th goal ties Rowdies team record

ST. PETERSBURG — Georgi Hristov tied a 40-year-old franchise record with his 57th career goal Saturday at Al Lang Stadium, fueling the Rowdies' 2-0 shutout of previously unbeaten Real Monarchs SLC.Hristov, a forward in his sixth season with Tam...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Rays Tales: How low can this team go compared to those Devil Rays days?

Rays Tales: How low can this team go compared to those Devil Rays days?

When the Rays, in the opening weekend of their 20th anniversary celebration season, brought back and honored the inaugural 1998 Devil Rays squad, it got us thinking unexpected thoughts, such as which was a better team:The first one, or the current on...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Rays Journal: Team effort pays off in 10-1 win over Twins

Rays Journal: Team effort pays off in 10-1 win over Twins

ST. PETERSBURG – Let's be clear here, the Rays still have a long way to go, and a lot of ground to make up.But seeing them play like they did Saturday in beating the Twins 10-1, putting on a solid all-around show in cobbling their first three-g...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Nicaragua's Ortega agrees to talk as deadly protests rage on

Nicaragua's Ortega agrees to talk as deadly protests rage on

Nicaragua's president has agreed to talks with business leaders over controversial social security reforms that sparked four days of protests and clashes
Updated: 1 hour ago
Judge homers, Yankees use 7-run 6th to beat Blue Jays 9-1

Judge homers, Yankees use 7-run 6th to beat Blue Jays 9-1

Aaron Judge hit an early homer off respected Twitter rival Marcus Stroman, then scored on a disputed play during a seven-run burst in the sixth inning that sent the New York Yankees over the Toronto Blue Jays 9-1
Updated: 1 hour ago
Kyle Busch pulls away at Richmond for 3rd Cup win a row

Kyle Busch pulls away at Richmond for 3rd Cup win a row

Kyle Busch pulled away on a restart in a two-lap overtime sprint to the finish for his third consecutive NASCAR's Cup Series victory
Updated: 1 hour ago
Lightning-Devils: How the NHLís top offense went on the defensive

Lightning-Devils: How the NHLís top offense went on the defensive

TAMPA — It was a couple of days after the Lightning beat the Bruins at home late in the regular season when associate coach Rick Bowness talked about how the defensive effort used in that shutout victory was the one the Lightning would need in ...
Updated: 2 hours ago