Thinner, more active women at lower risk of breast cancer, expert says

BARCELONA, Spain — Up to a third of breast cancer cases in Western countries could be avoided if women ate less and exercised more, researchers at a conference said Thursday, renewing a sensitive debate about how lifestyle factors affect the disease.

Better treatments, early diagnosis and mammogram screenings have dramatically slowed breast cancer, but experts said the focus should now shift to changing behaviors like diet and physical activity.

"What can be achieved with screening has been achieved. We can't do much more," Carlo La Vecchia, head of epidemiology at the University of Milan, said in an interview. "It's time to move on to other things."

La Vecchia spoke Thursday at a European breast cancer conference in Barcelona. He cited figures from the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which estimates that 25 to 30 percent of breast cancer cases could be avoided if women were thinner and exercised more. The agency is part of the World Health Organization.

His comments are in line with recent health advice that lifestyle changes in areas such as smoking, diet, exercise and sun exposure can play a significant role in risk for several cancers.

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. In Europe, there were about 421,000 new cases and nearly 90,000 deaths in 2008, the latest available figures. The United States last year saw more than 190,000 new cases and 40,000 deaths.

Pregnancy safe: Dr. Hatem Azim of the Institute Jules Bordet in Belgium told the conference that a study involving more than 1,400 pregnant women previously treated for breast cancer showed that pregnancy is safe and does not seem to be linked with the disease's recurrence. Women who have early and multiple pregnancies have a lower risk of getting breast cancer.

Thinner, more active women at lower risk of breast cancer, expert says 03/25/10 [Last modified: Thursday, March 25, 2010 11:13pm]

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