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U.N.: Russia hinders returning Georgians

Russian tanks drive through Tskhinvali, the capital of Georgia’s separatist province of South Ossetia, on Saturday. Russian forces entered Georgia after fighting broke out in South Ossetia.

Associated Press

Russian tanks drive through Tskhinvali, the capital of Georgia’s separatist province of South Ossetia, on Saturday. Russian forces entered Georgia after fighting broke out in South Ossetia.

TBILISI, Georgia — Russian troops remaining in Georgian territory are effectively preventing Georgians from returning to their homes, a U.N. representative said Saturday.

Melita Sunjic, spokeswoman for the U.N. High Commissioner of Refugees in Georgia, said that although it was not clear if Russian soldiers were actually preventing refugees from returning, the warnings by the troops effectively block them.

"If they say 'we can't guarantee your safety,' you don't go," she told the Associated Press.

Some 2,000 refugees are at UNHCR camps in Gori, and possibly thousands of others are in the region, hoping to return to villages that are in the so-called security zones that Russia has claimed for itself on Georgian territory.

The zones are near the border with separatist South Ossetia, the disputed province at the heart of the conflict that has ruined Georgia-Russia ties and caused the biggest crisis in Moscow's relations with the West since the 1991 Soviet collapse.

Fighting broke out Aug. 7 after Georgian forces launched a barrage on the South Ossetian capital of Tskhinvali, hoping to retake control of the province. Russian forces poured in, pushed the Georgians out in a matter of days and then drove deep into Georgia proper.

Under a European Union-brokered cease-fire, both sides were to return their forces to prewar positions, but Russia has interpreted one of the agreement's clauses as allowing it to set up 4-mile-deep security zones, which are now marked by Russian checkpoints.

Refugees coming into Georgia from those zones say they are being terrorized, beaten and robbed by South Ossetians.

In an article published today, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown said European nations should adopt a united energy policy to avoid becoming too dependent on Russia. Russia supplies the EU with about a third of its oil and about two-fifths of its natural gas.

"Without urgent action we risk sleepwalking into an energy dependence on less stable or reliable partners," Brown wrote in London's Observer newspaper.

U.N.: Russia hinders returning Georgians 08/30/08 [Last modified: Tuesday, November 2, 2010 2:48pm]

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