U.S. drought getting worse, report says; no relief in sight

A small boat navigates the Mississippi River at Vicksburg, Miss., on Thursday. The river has dropped to very low levels, unlike last year when it was flooding much of the Delta. The drop has exposed the river bottom, forcing barges to lighten their loads to keep from getting stuck.

Associated Press

A small boat navigates the Mississippi River at Vicksburg, Miss., on Thursday. The river has dropped to very low levels, unlike last year when it was flooding much of the Delta. The drop has exposed the river bottom, forcing barges to lighten their loads to keep from getting stuck.

ST. LOUIS — The widest drought to grip the United States in decades is getting worse with no signs of abating, a new report warned Thursday, as state officials urged conservation and more ranchers considered selling cattle.

The drought covering two-thirds of the continental United States had been considered relatively shallow, the product of months without rain, rather than years. But Thursday's report showed its intensity is rapidly increasing, with 20 percent of the nation now in the two worst stages of drought — up 7 percent from last week.

The U.S. Drought Monitor classifies drought in various stages, from moderate to severe, extreme and, ultimately, exceptional. Five states — Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri and Nebraska — are blanketed by a drought that is severe or worse. States like Arkansas and Oklahoma are nearly as bad, with most areas covered in a severe drought and large portions in extreme or exceptional drought.

Other states are seeing conditions rapidly worsen. Illinois, a key producer of corn and soybeans, saw its percentage of land in extreme or exceptional drought balloon from just 8 percent last week to roughly 71 percent as of Thursday, the Drought Monitor reported.

And conditions are not expected to get better, with little rain and more intense heat forecast for the rest of the summer.

"Realistically, the forecast going forward is a continuation of warm, dry conditions through the end of August easily, and we may see them in the fall," said Brian Fuchs, a climatologist at the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln.

U.S. drought getting worse, report says; no relief in sight 07/26/12 [Last modified: Thursday, July 26, 2012 10:23pm]

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...