U.S. tries new strategy for peace in Mideast

A Palestinian protester grabs the gate during a demonstration against Israel’s separation barrier in the West Bank village of Bilin near Ramallah on Friday. Israel says the barrier is needed for security, but Palestinians consider it a land grab.

Associated Press

A Palestinian protester grabs the gate during a demonstration against Israel’s separation barrier in the West Bank village of Bilin near Ramallah on Friday. Israel says the barrier is needed for security, but Palestinians consider it a land grab.

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration on Friday laid out a shift in its Mideast peace strategy, stepping up pressure on Israel and the Palestinians to resume stalled talks by moving immediately to negotiations on the toughest issues dividing them, like the borders of a Palestinian state and the status of Jerusalem.

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U.S. officials stressed that the shift does not abandon the administration's comprehensive approach to peace and said their overall aim is get the parties beyond daily disagreements and back to the negotiating table, where all issues would be discussed.

Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said that dealing with those matters first would eliminate Palestinian concerns about continued construction of Jewish settlements in disputed areas.

After a meeting at the State Department, Clinton and Jordanian Foreign Minister Nasser Judeh called for negotiations to begin as soon as possible and be bound by deadlines.

"Resolving borders resolves settlements, resolving Jerusalem resolves settlements," Clinton said. "I think we need to lift our sights and instead of being looking down at the trees, we need to look at the forest."

Peace efforts in the past have tended to focus on broader issues, including Israeli settlements, the fate of Palestinian refugees, and water, with the even more contentious matters like borders and Jerusalem being left for so-called final status talks.

Previous attempts to concentrate on the larger issues have ended in failure, notably the 2000 Camp David talks shepherded by former President Bill Clinton. At the end of the Clinton administration and through the eight years that George W. Bush occupied the White House, U.S. officials aimed for nuanced progress on more modest matters.

On Friday, Judeh lent support to the new U.S. tack. "If you resolve the question of borders then you automatically resolve not only settlements and Jerusalem but you identify the nature on the ground of the two-state solution and (what) it looks like," Judeh said.

Both Clinton and Judeh spoke out against new Israeli housing construction in East Jerusalem, which the Palestinians claim as their capital, saying it was damaging to the process.

After meeting Judeh, Clinton held similar talks with Egyptian Foreign Minister Ahmed Aboul Gheit and intelligence chief Omar Suleiman.

The Obama administration's initiative came as special Mideast peace envoy George Mitchell prepared to visit Europe next week and Israel and the Palestinian territories this month to try to relaunch stalled negotiations. Mitchell will visit Paris and Brussels first to build support for the approach from European officials.

When he travels to the region, Mitchell is expected to be carrying letters of "guarantees" outlining the U.S. position.

3 killed in strikes

Israeli airstrikes against targets in Gaza killed three men early Friday in a smuggling tunnel along the Gaza-Egypt border, Palestinian officials reported. The strikes came in retaliation for a rocket and mortar barrage launched into Israel on Thursday.

U.S. tries new strategy for peace in Mideast 01/08/10 [Last modified: Friday, January 8, 2010 11:25pm]

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