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Vigil at Caylee's house isn't a supportive one

Cindy Anthony, left, grandmother of missing 3-year-old Caylee Anthony, confronts Kittie Gonzalez, right, one of several protesters outside the child’s home in Orlando.

Associated Press

Cindy Anthony, left, grandmother of missing 3-year-old Caylee Anthony, confronts Kittie Gonzalez, right, one of several protesters outside the child’s home in Orlando.

ORLANDO — Each night, a half-dozen protesters plant lawn chairs across the street from the home of missing 3-year-old Caylee Anthony, demanding a confession from her mother and grandparents.

"Baby killer," one woman's sign reads. "My mommy did it!" reads another.

But all they get is silence: The child's family stays quiet night after night, its yard lined with yellow caution tape and "No Trespassing" signs, and a collage of the hazel-eyed child's photographs taped to the front door.

Three months after Caylee disappeared under mysterious circumstances, the protesters have joined the crowd of reporters and gawkers outside the family's suburban Orlando home, hoping to get what police so far have not: a statement that the little girl is dead. They believe the girl's 22-year-old mother, Casey Anthony, killed her and that her grandparents, Cindy and George Anthony, are covering it up.

The protesters taunt the family at all hours, some dressing up in costumes and even recording rock songs about the case. There has been a videotaped scuffle and even 911 calls, but the group is undeterred in its mission.

"It's putting pressure on them," said Cathy Harris, a mother of 10 who is among the group staking out the home.

Protesters show up at all hours. It is not the typical, supportive vigil so often seen when a child disappears.

The neighbors are tired of the spectacle and are asking a court to move the protesters to a vacant lot. They are afraid to let their children outside and some can't sleep at night. The Orange County Sheriff's Office has been called to the Anthony home more than 40 times since Caylee was reported missing.

"It was a nice, quiet neighborhood," said Bill Fulton, president of the neighborhood association. "It's changed."

Vigil at Caylee's house isn't a supportive one 09/22/08 [Last modified: Wednesday, September 24, 2008 7:38pm]

    

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