Here’s the latest.

First, a look at the radar over Florida as of 5:00 p.m. Monday. For a look at the live, interactive radar, click here.

Radar image shows Subtropical Storm Alberto as it bears down on the Florida Panhandle as of 5:00 p.m. on Mon., May 28, 2018. [TBO]
Radar image shows Subtropical Storm Alberto as it bears down on the Florida Panhandle as of 5:00 p.m. on Mon., May 28, 2018. [TBO]


Other updates

  • As of Monday at 5 p.m., the storm made landfall near Laguna Beach, Florida. It is located about 15 miles west-northwest of Panama City, Florida.  
  • It is moving north at 9 mph and has maximum sustained winds of 45 mph. The storm picked up speed throughout the day Sunday, but slowed back down Sunday night and into Monday. It was expected to keep its Sunday pace until it made landfall, but the storm has slowed some throughout Monday.
  • County emergency officials continue to monitor flood-prone areas, but so far no issues have been reported. According to the National Weather Service, some areas along Florida’s west coast were forecast to get as much as 1-4 inches of rain.  
  • The Sunshine Skyway Bridge remains open to all traffic, but the Florida Highway Patrol urges caution as winds pick up.

Watches and warnings:

A tropical storm warning is NO LONGER IN EFFECT east of the Aucilla River, so much of Florida is now in the clear.

[National Hurricane Center]
[National Hurricane Center]

A tropical storm warning is in effect from Aucilla River to the Alabama/Florida border.

A storm surge watch is in effect from the Suwannee River to Mexico Beach. The Tampa Bay is not longer under a storm surge watch at the moment, but that could, of course, change.

Rip current risks remain in effect for coastal areas along Tampa Bay through Tuesday night.

The region remains at risk for flash flooding that could cause street ponding, and rivers may rise above flood stage with swift currents, according to the National Weather Service.

What to expect:

Residents along the much of Florida’s Panhandle coast can expect tropical storm conditions leading to Alberto’s forecast landfall later Monday afternoon. Heavy rainfall is forecast to continue early Monday, with scattered thunderstorms into the afternoon.

It is forecast to produce rainfall totals of 4-8 inches in the Florida Panhandle with isolated totals of 12 inches.

The Tampa Bay area can expect tides 1-2 feet above normal, and above-average tides through midweek, and dangerous rip currents.

The southern flow from the storm is producing humid conditions across the region.

JIM DAMASKE | Times Dawn patrol. Sea turtle nest monitors with the Clearwater Marine Aquarium return in the rain from north end of Clearwater Beach as rain falls on the beach early Sunday morning 5/27/2018 as northbound Subtropical Storm Alberto looms in the gulf to the southwest.
JIM DAMASKE | Times Dawn patrol. Sea turtle nest monitors with the Clearwater Marine Aquarium return in the rain from north end of Clearwater Beach as rain falls on the beach early Sunday morning 5/27/2018 as northbound Subtropical Storm Alberto looms in the gulf to the southwest.

Meteorologists are calling Alberto a ‘subtropical storm.’ What the heck is that?

We’re all waking up to the impacts of Alberto: dreary rain, gusty wind, the reluctant change of Memorial Day plans.

But while the effects are routine for storm-weathering Floridians, the category of storm Alberto falls into is a little less familiar. Meteorologists are calling it a “subtropical storm,” not to be confused with the just plain tropical storms we know and dread.

So, what does that mean?

Read more