Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

5 deaths cited in consumption of energy drink

Five people may have died over the past three years after drinking Monster Energy, a popular energy drink that is high in caffeine, according to incident reports recently released by the Food and Drug Administration. The reports, like similar filings made with the FDA in cases connected with drugs or medical devices, do not prove a link between Monster Energy and the deaths or health problems. The records were recently obtained under the Freedom of Information Act by the mother of a 14-year-old Maryland girl who died in December from a heart arrhythmia after drinking large cans of Monster Energy on two consecutive days. Last week, Wendy Crossland, the mother of that teenager, filed a lawsuit against Monster Beverage. A company spokeswoman said its products are safe.

Britain

BBC editor steps aside in scandal

A scandal scarring the BBC's reputation widened Monday as the corporation announced that the editor of a news program was "stepping aside" after giving an "inaccurate or incomplete" account of why he abandoned an investigation into Sir Jimmy Savile, a high-profile television personality accused of sexually abusing some 200 girls over a career spanning decades. Editor Peter Rippon, head of the Newsnight program, was the first BBC News executive to face public censure in the scandal. Savile was hailed as a popular fixture in children's TV when he died at 84 last year.

Kansas City, Mo.

Company restarts Keystone pipeline

Oil resumed flowing Monday afternoon through the Keystone oil pipeline that carries about 590,000 barrels of crude per day from Canada to facilities in the Midwest. TransCanada had shut down the 2,100-mile pipeline Wednesday after tests showed possible safety issues. Company spokesman Shawn Howard said there were no leaks and "the integrity of the pipeline system is sound."

China

Tibetan man sets self on fire, dies

A Tibetan man in his 50s set himself on fire and died at a monastery in northwestern China in the latest such protest against Chinese rule over the Himalayan region, a London-based rights group said. Free Tibet said the man identified as Dhondup set fire to himself near the prayer hall at the remote Labrang Monastery in Gan­su province on Monday. Dozens of Tibetans have set themselves on fire since March 2011 in ethnic Tibetan areas of China in protest over what activists say is Beijing's heavy-handed rule in the region.

Elsewhere

Israel: Former President Jimmy Carter said Monday during a visit to Jerusalem that the prospect of an Israel-Palestinian peace accord is "vanishing," blaming Israeli settlement of the West Bank. He is a longtime critic of Israeli policies.

South Korea: South Korean activists on Monday floated balloons carrying tens of thousands of anti-Pyongyang leaflets into North Korea, eluding police who tried to block the launch after threats from the North.

5 deaths cited in consumption of energy drink 10/22/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 9:19am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Steve Kornell says small fix can help St. Pete's sewage problems

    Water

    ST. PETERSBURG— Steve Kornell knows his idea won't put much of a dent in the $326 million bill the city must pay over the next five years to fix its inadequate and outdated sewer system.

    St. Petersburg City Council member Steve Kornell (right) during a 2012 council meeting at City Hall. [SCOTT KEELER  |  Times]
  2. Can the Bad Boys Mowers Gasparilla Bowl thrive in competitive sports market?

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — It's a funky name: the Bad Boys Mowers Gasparilla Bowl. But the new sponsors for the former St. Petersburg Bowl might need more than an eye-catching name to create a thriving, profitable contest.

    NC State head coach Dave Doeren clutches the championship trophy after winning the Bitcoin Bowl at Tropicana Field in St. Petersburg in 2014. Bowl organizers are changing the name of the game to the Bad Boy Mowers Gasparilla Bowl.
[

MONICA HERNDON | TIMES]
  3. Dirk Koetter says Bucs used team meeting to discuss social issues

    Bucs

    Four days before their preseason home opener against the Cleveland Browns, which had 12 players not stand for the national anthem prior to their last game, the Bucs used their team meeting to discuss social issues that might have led to that demonstration, coach Dirk Koetter said.

    "The main thing is we have to respect everybody's opinion," Dirk Koetter said, "because everybody is not going to agree." [AP photo]
  4. Rookie tight end Antony Auclair making case to stick with Bucs

    Bucs

    Don't let his modest preseason stats fool you: Antony Auclair, the undrafted rookie tight end from Canada is making a strong case to stick around on the Bucs' 53-man roster this season.

    Bucs tight end Antony Auclair (82) collides with a defender following a catch during training camp. [CHARLIE KAIJO   |   Times]
  5. Who is that 'Blacks for Trump' guy standing behind the president at his Phoenix rally

    National

    At a number of political rallies over the last two years, a character calling himself "Michael the Black Man" has appeared in the crowd directly behind Donald Trump, impossible to miss and possibly planted.

    Michael the Black Man, variously known as Michael Symonette, Maurice Woodside and Mikael Israel, holds up a sign as President Donald Trump speaks to a crowd at the Phoenix Convention Center during a rally on Tuesday in Phoenix, Arizona.  [Ralph Freso | Getty Images]