California may redefine when cops can shoot; Trump wants military to secure Mexican border; woman wounds 3 at YouTube, then fatally shoots self; Grindr to stop sharing HIV status with third parties; more in U.S. news

In this Thursday, March 22, 2018, photo, a young man joins others at a demonstration outside the Sacramento City Hall to protest the shooting of Stephon Alonzo Clark, by a pair of Sacramento Police officers. Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn, the city's first black police chief, is an unlikely officer, growing up in a tough neighborhood of California's capital city and having his own early run-ins with police. He is struggling to find the right balance of reforms after the fatal shooting of Clark by his officers. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) CARP206
In this Thursday, March 22, 2018, photo, a young man joins others at a demonstration outside the Sacramento City Hall to protest the shooting of Stephon Alonzo Clark, by a pair of Sacramento Police officers. Sacramento Police Chief Daniel Hahn, the city's first black police chief, is an unlikely officer, growing up in a tough neighborhood of California's capital city and having his own early run-ins with police. He is struggling to find the right balance of reforms after the fatal shooting of Clark by his officers. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) CARP206
Published April 3 2018

California

When can cops shoot?

Several lawmakers and the family of a 22-year-old unarmed black man who was fatally shot by Sacramento police proposed Tuesday that California become the first state to significantly restrict when officers can open fire. The legislation would change the standard to "necessary force." That means police would be allowed to shoot only if "there were no other reasonable alternatives" to prevent imminent serious injury or death, said Lizzie Buchen of the ACLU, which is among the groups behind the measure. "We need to ensure that our state policy governing the use of deadly force stresses the sanctity of human life and is only used when necessary," said assemblywoman Shirley Weber, a San Diego Democrat who introduced the bill. The goal is to encourage officers to defuse confrontations or use less deadly weapons, said co-author Democratic Assemblyman Kevin McCarty of Sacramento. Weber, who heads a public safety oversight committee, said she hopes the heavily publicized string of police shootings and mass protests over Stephon Clark’s death will help pass the bill. Two Sacramento officers, reporting to calls of car break-ins, shot the 22-year-old in his grandparents’ back yard within seconds and without identifying themselves because they thought he had a gun. He had only a cellphone.

Washington, D.C.

Impatient for wall, Trump wants military to secure Mexican border

Frustrated by slow action on his major campaign promise to build a "big, beautiful wall," President Donald Trump said Tuesday he wants to use the military to secure the U.S.-Mexico border until his promised wall is built. Trump told reporters he’s been discussing the idea with Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. "We’re going to be doing things militarily. Until we can have a wall and proper security, we’re going to be guarding our border with the military," Trump said. It wasn’t immediately clear exactly how the proposal would work or what kind of troops Trump wanted to deploy, and the Pentagon struggled to answer questions about the plan. But the White House later said Trump wanted to mobilize the National Guard. Federal law prohibits the use of active-duty service members for law enforcement inside the U.S., unless specifically authorized by Congress. But over the past 12 years, presidents have twice sent National Guard troops to the border to bolster security and assist with surveillance and other support. The White House counsel’s office has been working on the idea for several weeks. Trump has previously suggested using the Pentagon’s budget to pay for building the wall, arguing it is a national security priority, despite strict rules that prohibit spending that’s not authorized by Congress.

White House plans tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese imports: The Trump administration is recommending 25 percent tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese imports to protest Beijing’s alleged theft of American technology. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has issued a list targeting 1,300 Chinese products, including industrial robots and telecommunications equipment. But the proposed tariffs wouldn’t take effect before a public comment period ends May 11. American businesses worry the administration’s moves will draw painful retaliatory sanctions.

DHS suspects cellphone spying: For the first time, the U.S. government has publicly acknowledged the existence in Washington of what appear to be rogue devices that foreign spies and criminals could be using to track individual cellphones and intercept calls and messages. In a letter to Oregon Sen. Ron Wyden, the Department of Homeland Security acknowledged that last year it identified suspected unauthorized cell-site simulators in the nation’s capital. The agency said it had not determined the type of devices in use or who might have been operating them. Nor did it say how many it detected or where. The agency’s response suggests little has been done about such equipment.

California

Woman wounds 3 at YouTube, then fatally shoots self

A woman opened fire Tuesday at YouTube headquarters, wounding three people before fatally shooting herself as terrified employees huddled inside, police and witnesses said. Officers and federal agents swarmed the company’s suburban campus sandwiched between two interstates in the San Francisco Bay Area city of San Bruno. YouTube employee Dianna Arnspiger said she was on the building’s second floor when she heard gun shots, ran to a window and saw the shooter on a patio outside. She said the woman wore glasses and a scarf and was using a "big huge pistol." Zach Vorhies, 37, a senior software engineer at Youtube, said he saw the shooter yelling, "Come at me, or come get me." Officers found the shooter with what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound several minutes later, San Bruno police Chief Ed Barberini said. He said three other people had gunshot wounds and a fourth person suffered an ankle injury. YouTube’s headquarters has more than a thousand engineers and other employees in several buildings. San Francisco General Hospital received three patients: a 36-year-old man in critical condition, a 32-year-old woman in serious condition and a 27-year-old woman in fair condition.

Nation

Grindr changes policy on outside sharing
of users’ HIV status

Grindr, a gay dating app, will stop sharing users’ HIV statuses with third parties. The policy change came over outcry after a BuzzFeed report Monday that said personal data was being passed to two outside vendors hired by Grindr to test the performance of its app. Apptimize and Localytics are fed user data that includes HIV statuses, GPS data, phone numbers and email addresses that, when combined, could expose someone’s private health information, researchers told BuzzFeed. On Monday, Grindr said it would never sell personally identifiable information to third parties. "We understand the sensitivities around HIV status disclosure," said Scott Chen, Grindr’s chief technology officer. The app offers users the option to list their HIV status and test dates, aimed at informing potential sexual partners. Grindr launched in 2009, years before Tinder, and helped pioneer a fast and location-specific approach to dating. Grindr has since expanded from a hookup app to a broader digital platform advocating for LGBTQ issues. Gay and bisexual men’s HIV status in particular remains highly sensitive because of discrimination and stigma.

Elsewhere

Mueller investigation hands down first punishment: A Dutch attorney, Alex van der Zwaan, who lied to federal agents investigating former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort was sentenced to 30 days in prison and a $20,000 fine.

Backlash changes minds: The Interior Department has backed down from a plan to impose steep fee increases at popular national parks. Republican and Democratic lawmakers and governors said such fees would push out many Americans.

Spotify strikes a chord on Wall Street: Investors on Tuesday bet the unprofitable company’s trend-setting music streaming service will maintain its early lead over Apple and other powerful challengers. Spotify’s shares traded as high as $169 in their stock market debut before falling back slightly and closing at $149.01.

Cosby jury to hear account that accuser was scheming: In a victory for Bill Cosby, the judge in his sexual assault trial ruled Tuesday to admit testimony from a Temple University academic adviser who says Cosby’s central accuser, Andrea Constand, told her she could make money by framing a celebrity. Dozens of women say Cosby, 80, assaulted them after giving them an intoxicant. The trial is scheduled to start next week. — tbt* wires

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