Thursday, September 20, 2018
News Roundup

Missed deadlines nothing new for Rick Scott’s disaster agency

TALLAHASSEE ó Gov. Rick Scottís disaster management agency repeatedly violated federal requirements to reimburse Florida cities and counties for the cost of storm damage in a timely manner, agency auditors discovered in routine reviews.

The inspector general in the Division of Emergency Management cited "preventable delays" in paying cities, counties, school districts, hospitals and even state agencies for the cost of recovery from past floods, tornadoes and hurricanes.

The stateís slow pace will likely become a bigger issue because reimbursement costs will be higher from Hurricane Irma, the Category 4 storm that caused widespread death and destruction starting Sept. 10 in the Keys and along much of Floridaís southwest coast.

The inspector generalís annual report, dated Sept. 21, said the agency was violating federal law requiring timely payments on small and large projects after concluding a review of 33 earlier recovery requests. Payment delays were criticized 15 months earlier in a previous audit.

The latest report urged the Division of Emergency Managementís bureaus of finance and recovery to come up with procedures to ensure payments within 30 days.

Under Scottís direct control, the Division of Emergency Management is responsible for helping Floridians prepare for natural disasters.

Less well-known to the public is the agencyís other duty, to process the multitude of requests for reimbursement for the costs of recovering from disasters.

Wes Maul, Scottís acting director of the agency who has held the job for less than a month, says improvements are coming.

"Division staff are laser-focused on getting Floridaís communities the funds they are due as expeditiously as possible," agency spokesman Alberto Moscoso said this week.

Despite the assurances, reimbursements lag, especially in financially struggling rural communities with little ability to raise revenue.

Most of the reimbursement money comes from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. But before the payments are delivered throughout Florida, the state reviews every request and documents the expenses.

The inspector generalís latest findings come as hundreds of local governments and even some state agencies are still waiting for checks to arrive from the state for the costs of police overtime, emergency shelters, road and bridge repair and other protective measures from back-to-back Hurricanes Hermine and Matthew last year.

According to state records through Tuesday, the state owes Pinellas County about $1.7 million from Hermine, which hammered the state in September 2016. Pasco County is still owed about $725,000 from that storm.

Matthew, which hit the east coast more than a month later, has left a much longer trail of unpaid recovery costs.

They include nearly $2 million in Broward County, more than $6 million in Palm Beach County and an estimated $25 million for Jacksonville.

Of the $136 million thatís been approved for reimbursements to localities, only about half, $69 million, has been reimbursed. An additional $235 million is still being reviewed by FEMA.

In recent days, more money has begun to shake loose.

In Bunnell on northeast Floridaís coast, Flagler County Administrator Craig Coffey finally got word this week that the county will soon be reimbursed about $450,000 for six separate Matthew cleanup projects.

"Iíll believe it when I see the money," Coffey said. "But at least now we have their attention."

The September report wasnít the first time the Division of Emergency Managementís troubleshooters flagged payment problems.

In a June 2016 report, auditors said the agency "did not consistently comply with state and federal regulations for payments" to recipients.

The agency didnít challenge any of the findings and said that "due to staff turnover and vacancies, the payments processed during this audit period were not all able to be submitted in a timely manner."

In response to questions, the Division of Emergency Services provided the Times/Herald a two-page agency reorganization plan begun under former director Bryan Koon, who left Oct. 1 for a job in the private sector.

Koonís April 25 memo said in part: "We made a number of moves that will allow us to provide better customer service."

Maul, Koonís interim replacement, told legislators this week that more improvements are needed at the agency.

Maul was chief of staff at the agency before he took over on an acting basis Oct. 1. He told the Senate Appropriations Committee that his staff is prepared to take on the job of reviewing Irmaís claims, even while still paying bills for Matthew and Hermine.

Citing the payment delays from Matthew and Hermine, Maul told lawmakers, the state is working more closely with FEMA on an "expedited process" that will result in paying Irmaís claims more quickly.

Reading from a prepared text, he told senators: "While the division continues to work diligently on assisting communities with their Hermine and Matthew reimbursements, we certainly stand ready to begin processing Irma projects."

Contact Steve Bousquet at [email protected] Follow @stevebousquet.

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