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Forget Florida and Arizona: More baby boomers are heading to the Rocky Mountain West.WESTWARD HO!

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo.

John Kerr wasn't dreaming of palm trees and balmy winters when he retired from WGBH, the Boston public TV station. His thoughts had gone west.

The 69-year-old put on a green uniform and Smokey Bear hat and became a seasonal ranger in Yellowstone National Park, where snow can fall every month of the year, including July.

"That's why they have wood stoves and furnaces," Kerr said. "Warm weather isn't the issue for me. It's keeping vital and interested and involved."

Forget the warmth of Florida and Arizona: Demographers say thousands of people like Kerr are heading to the Rocky Mountain West in their later years.

Baby boomers, in particular, are gravitating toward the peaks and sagebrush basins of Wyoming and Montana, promising to turn the populations of these states from relatively young into two of the nation's oldest.

The newcomers are drawn by low crime, fresh air, little traffic and abundant outdoor activities, said Larry Swanson, an economist and director of the Center for the Rocky Mountain West, in Missoula, Mont.

Although people of all ages like those things, older people tend to be flexible enough in their careers, families and finances to finally kick up their boots on a porch rail, he said.

"If you're 25, you say, 'I'd like to live here, but maybe someday in the future,' " Swanson said. "But if you're 45 or 55, the future is now."

In 2000, Montana ranked 18th and Wyoming 43rd for the relative size of their 65-and-over populations. But by 2030, the Census Bureau predicts Montana will rank fifth and Wyoming third for their over-65 populations.

Florida is expected to remain on top for that age group. Wyoming and Montana will both likely be a good deal older than Arizona — but the two states are not seeking older people. Instead, Wyoming and Montana are being "discovered."

Laurie Lyman, 55, was an elementary school teacher in San Diego when she began traveling to Yellowstone to watch wolves. In 2005, she decided it was time to get as close to the wolves as she could.

"I said to my husband, 'You know what? Life's too short. I'm going,' " she recalled.

She said many people like her are snapping up property around Yellowstone.

The two states are preparing for the influx. Montana recently established a trust fund so the state's older population will have access to health care and other essential services, even in rural areas.

"We've done projections . . . and see our elderly population doubling in the next 10 to 15 years," said Charlie Rehbein, chief of the Montana Aging Services Bureau. "I think it's going to have a tremendous impact."

One challenge is that the two states already have very low unemployment, around 3 percent. They could face a labor crunch starting in 2011, when the oldest boomers hit the traditional retirement age of 65.

Rather than struggle with a labor shortage, Wyoming officials hope to get older people to stay in the workplace and to persuade business owners to hire older workers, said Rob Black, policy analyst for Gov. Dave Freudenthal.

Swanson, the economist, said most of the boomers moving to the state plan to work. Bostonian Kerr, for example, said he would continue working — for now.

"My life hasn't slowed down," he said. "I've found a lot of sustenance — spiritual sustenance, I suppose — in the natural world. I think it helps put our fast-paced world into balance."

Working was what Lee and Beth Dix had in mind in 1999 when they began thinking about leaving Washington, D.C. He was a systems analyst for IBM Corp., and she was a corporate planner for Fairchild Corp.

Lee Dix, now 62, said the couple researched dozens of communities in Idaho, Montana and Wyoming, then flew to Denver and started driving. The couple ended up in Cheyenne, Wyo., the first overnight stop on their trip.

He said the couple did not even consider Florida or Arizona, after sweltering in Washington's summer.

"Except for the wind here, this is a pretty ideal place for us," he said.

Forget Florida and Arizona: More baby boomers are heading to the Rocky Mountain West.WESTWARD HO! 02/25/08 [Last modified: Thursday, October 28, 2010 8:54am]
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