Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Splitting an entree is smart, not cheap

DETROIT

We were in a restaurant in another city, far from home. No one could possibly know me.

So why not just do this? What do I care what these people think?

I turned to my husband, looked him straight in the eyes and made a daring proposal: "Let's split an entree."

It was something I had never done before because of worries about a whole litany of things that, in retrospect, sound foolish. Would the server think that I was cheap? Would we get poor service because it was assumed we would be lousy tippers? And in fairness to the business, shouldn't we order two meals because two of us were drinking water, using silverware, eating bread and occupying two chairs?

I know I'm not the only one in the world who has thought some of those things and ended up with leftovers that weren't all that great the next day, and a bill for more money than they had to spend.

Portions are becoming more reasonable at some restaurants, especially chef-driven places whose guests come primarily for the quality — not quantity — of food.

But at too many restaurants, serving sizes are still absurdly large.

Ordering a split plate can be the ideal solution, especially when you're traveling. And after working up my nerve to do it once, I know I can do it again.

I've thought about it and my table's split entree won't make or break the house that night, so I won't feel guilty about it.

If a server tries to make me feel awkward, I won't return. And if my service is poor, the server will get even less than the lower tip he assumed he'd get.

Some restaurants, especially upscale ones, may — legitimately — tack on an extra cost to split one plate into two, the justification being they end up serving bread and two salads (if they're included) and use extra garnishes and sauces when dividing the dish in the kitchen.

As for tips, I think anytime split plates are ordered and service is good, the gratuity should reflect the server's work for two people, not just one.

Splitting an entree is smart, not cheap 11/27/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, November 27, 2012 3:30am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Tribune News Service.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. After huge sinkhole opens, residents weigh future with unease

    Public Safety

    LAND O'LAKES — The wood floors creak each time Kendra Denzik dashes inside her darkened home to grab fresh clothes. She can't help but panic when they do.

    Eleven families along Ocean Pines Drive in Land O’Lakes homes are fenced in due to the massive sinkhole from last Friday on Thursday, July 20, 2017. The Doohen’s are among 11 families who had to evacuate from their homes.
  2. Tampa Club president seeks assessment fee from members

    News

    TAMPA — The president of the Tampa Club said he asked members last month to pay an additional assessment fee to provide "additional revenue." However, Ron Licata said Friday that the downtown business group is not in a dire financial situation.

    Ron Licata, president of the Tampa Club in downtown Tampa. [Tampa Club]
  3. Under Republican health care bill, Florida must make up $7.5 billion

    Markets

    If a Senate bill called the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 becomes law, Florida's government would need to make up about $7.5 billion to maintain its current health care system. The bill, which is one of the Republican Party's long-promised answers to the Affordable Care Act imposes a cap on funding per enrollee …

    Florida would need to cover $7.5 billion to keep its health care program under the Republican-proposed Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.  [Times file photo]
  4. Photo gallery: Minors also a training ground for umpires with big-league dreams

    News

    Taylor Payne, 24, and Tom Fornarola, 23, are two of the 23 first-year umpires scattered around the bottom rungs of minor-league baseball this summer. They never met until they were assigned together but quickly developed a strong rapport. Like the players themselves, the two umpires have dreams of reaching the major …

    Umpire Tom Fornarola, 23, left, and Taylor Payne, 24, head for the locker room after the Gulf Coast League game between the New York Yankees and the Detroit Tigers at the Tigertown complex in Lakeland, Fla. on Wednesday, July 5, 2017.
  5. Minors also a training ground for umpires with big-league dreams

    The Heater

    Umpire Tom Fornarola, 23, left, and Taylor Payne, 24, facing, talk before the start of the Gulf Coast League game between the New York Yankees and the Detroit Tigers at the Tigertown complex in Lakeland, Fla. on Wednesday, July 5, 2017.