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American Community Survey gives snapshot of Tampa Bay residents

Ever wonder just how diverse your neighborhood is? Here's a color-coded map that lays it out. It was created using an index ranging from 0 to 1, which measures the probability that two people picked at random in a vicinity will be of a different race or ethnic background. Translation: The more diverse an area is, the more blue it is in this map. The less diverse areas are represented in shades of green.

DARLA CAMERON | Times

Ever wonder just how diverse your neighborhood is? Here's a color-coded map that lays it out. It was created using an index ranging from 0 to 1, which measures the probability that two people picked at random in a vicinity will be of a different race or ethnic background. Translation: The more diverse an area is, the more blue it is in this map. The less diverse areas are represented in shades of green.

How much do you know about the Tampa Bay area — about you, about us?

Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau released data from the latest American Community Survey. The information provides an intriguing look at who we are — everything from how much money we make to how many miles we drive to work and how educated we are.

It isn't like the traditional 10-year census, but it's run by the same folks. Every year, they set out to sample portions of the population to find out how people in this country are living their lives.

Here's a glimpse of some of the highlights of the data compiled from the Tampa Bay area in 2009 and from the 2000 census:

• Not surprisingly, our paychecks aren't as fat as they were several years ago, when adjusted for inflation. The drop in pay was worse in our most urban counties — Hillsborough and Pinellas — compared with our more rural counties, Pasco and Hernando.

• Though the country's median household income is more than $50,000, that figure was lower in all four Tampa Bay area counties — and significantly lower in Pasco and Hernando counties. In addition, most of us spent at least 30 percent of that on housing.

• Between 12 and 15 percent of us live in poverty, though that's not too far out of line with the rest of the state and country.

• We love our cars. The percentage of us who drive to work is more than the rest of the nation. In addition, those of us who live in Pasco and Hernando counties drive an extra five minutes, on average, than residents of Pinellas and Hillsborough counties to get to work.

• About 85 percent of us graduated high school, which is about the national average. But when it comes to college degrees, Pasco and Hernando counties are well below the national average.

• The median age of Americans and Floridians both went up from 2000 to 2009. Pinellas and Hills-borough counties also got older in that time. But the median age in Hernando and Pasco counties actually got younger.

Our homes

Median monthly mortgage

Hernando $1,171

Hillsborough $1,623

Pinellas $1,525

Pasco $1,394

Florida $1,565

U.S. $1,505

Median monthly rent

Hernando $853

Hillsborough $918

Pinellas $914

Pasco $866

Florida $952

U.S. $842

Our money

Median household income 2009 and change from 2000 census*

Hernando, $40,728, -1.97

Hillsborough, $47,168, -9.06

Pinellas , $43,225 ,-8.68

Pasco , $40,154, -4.51

Florida, $44,708, -9.71

U.S., $50,224, -6.23

*Adjusted for inflation

Those living in poverty in 2009

Hernando 12 percent

Hillsborough 15 percent

Pinellas 13 percent

Pasco 13 percent

Florida15 percent

U.S.14 percent

Our education

High school graduates (adults 25 and older)

Hernando 84 percent

Hillsborough 86 percent

Pinellas 88 percent

Pasco 85 percent

Florida 85 percent

U.S. 85 percent

Higher degrees (at least a bachelor's)

Hernando 15 percent

Hillsborough 28 percent

Pinellas 25 percent

Pasco 18 percent

Florida 25 percent

U.S. 28 percent

Our makeup

Population

Hernando 171,000

Hillsborough 1.2 million

Pinellas 909,000

Pasco 472,000

Florida 18.5 million

U.S. 307 million

Age

Median age in 2000

Hernando
Median age in 2000: 49.5
Median in 2009: 46.7
Under 18: 20%
65 and older: 26%

Hillsborough
Median age in 2000: 35.1
Median in 2009: 35.6
Under 18: 24%
65 and older: 12%

Pinellas
Median age in 2000: 43
Median in 2009: 45.3
Under 18: 18%
65 and older: 21%

Pasco
Median age in 2000: 44.9
Median in 2009: 43.2
Under 18: 21%
65 and older: 21%

Florida
Median age in 2000: 38.7
Median in 2009: 40.1
Under 18: 22%
65 and older: 17%

U.S.
Median age in 2000: 35.3
Median in 2009: 36.8
Under 18: 24
65 and older: 13%

Getting there

How many of us drive to work alone?

Hernando 82 percent

Hillsborough 80 percent

Pinellas 81 percent

Pasco 82 percent

Florida 79 percent

U.S. 76 percent

Average commute to work

Hernando 30 min

Hillsborough 24.6 min

Pinellas 23.2 min

Pasco 30.2 min

Florida 25.4 min

U.S. 25.1 min

For more information and data, visit www.census.gov.

American Community Survey gives snapshot of Tampa Bay residents 12/19/10 [Last modified: Sunday, December 19, 2010 7:04pm]
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