Global Bizarre

Criminals need contingency plans

Backup plans

Uncashed check leads man to commit robbery

Bank robbery was Plan B for a man in Spartanburg, S.C. He went in to the bank with a check for $173 and told the teller that he needed it cashed or someone was going to kill him. But there wasn't enough money in the account to cover the check, so the teller said no. So he scribbled a note that said he was robbing the bank. The teller gave him a fistful of cash, and he ran away. Police have a suspect but have not made an arrest.

No food for free, so he pays for it

A gunman entered the Taco John restaurant in Kalispell, Mont., demanding food and cash. But the employee said no. That wasn't what the gunman was expecting at all, and without a contingency plan for outright refusal, he came up with a Plan B on the fly. And that was to order the food he wanted, pay for it, eat it and leave, according the KAJ-TV. Police later arrested Shane Roe, 27, at a nearby motel and charged him with attempted armed robbery.

Cracking case

Cops happy to make easy arrest

When officers Hope Kingery and George Miller pulled over a car they suspected as being stolen in Lake Charles, La., they couldn't have known how easy their night was going to get. They called the registered owner of the car and left a message. She called back and asked if they could sell her $150 worth of crack cocaine. Police don't sell crack, but they went to visit Jill Foreman anyway and arrested her. "Officers put in a lot of energy to close a case, so we never mind getting one on sheer luck and stupidity," Lake Charles police Sgt. Mark Kraus said.

After much thought ...

Panel takes time to answer petition

The nuclear energy watchdog group New England Coalition filed a petition with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission concerning the safety of the Vermont Yankee plant in Montpelier, Vt. The group wanted the commission to consider an environmental review of the plant and its impact on human safety. It filed this petition in 1975. The commission responded on March 11. It said no. "At least the NRC is, if not prompt, consistent," said coalition member Raymond Shadis.

Physical education

Teacher's tardy policy ends in arrest

Brian Havel had — past tense — an interesting policy of making his students do push-ups or sit-ups when they were late for class at Delta High School in western Colorado. That would make sense if it was gym class, maybe, but Havel, 22, taught — past tense — English. The story takes an unfortunate turn on March 14, when a student was tardy and wasn't up for calisthenics. "He either wouldn't or couldn't complete them," interim police Chief Roger Christian told the Denver Post of the punished student. So classmates offered up an alternative punishment: They would punch the student. Havel thought that worked, and 10 to 15 classmates punched him. He wasn't seriously hurt, but Havel faces charges of child abuse. The school district's spokesman had a brief statement. "We do have (Havel's) letter of resignation."

Compiled from Times wire services and other sources by staff writer Jim Webster, who can be reached at jwebster@sptimes.com.

Criminals need contingency plans 04/01/08 [Last modified: Wednesday, November 3, 2010 11:17am]

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