The skinny

The skinny: 1,810-pound Wis. pumpkin sets Guinness world record

Cinderella's limo

1,810-pound pumpkin earns heaviest record

Guinness World Records has confirmed that a massive pumpkin grown in Wisconsin is the world's heaviest. The gourd grown by Chris Stevens of New Richmond tips the scales at 1,810.5 pounds. That's 85 pounds heavier than the previous record, a 1,725-pound pumpkin grown last year in Ohio. Stevens' pumpkin has a circumference of 186.5 inches, or more than 15 feet. He unveiled it earlier this month at the Stillwater Harvest Fest in Minnesota. He said at the time his secret is a precise mixture of sunshine, rain, cow manure, fish emulsion and seaweed.

No fries with advice

Law firm likes its drive-through

Legal service at one Connecticut firm can now be as easy to get as a hamburger and fries. The Kocian Law Group opened a drive-through office in a building that once housed a former Kenny Rogers Roasters. Lawyer Nick Kocian says clients can use the drive-through at the law firm's Manchester site to drop off and pick up documents. A paralegal works at the window, handing out documents and answering questions. Clients still have to come in for consultations and meetings with lawyers.

Cheap car rentals

Park-and-fly drives into problems

British vacationer Dean Dolling, who left his Hyundai sedan with Airparks, a London airport valet parking service, returned to find it had been hired out to an Australian tourist. His proof: business papers on the back seat and a call from the Australian. There were other instances reported by customers, according to a BBC program. At least one customer's car was used by parking service staff for shopping trips to the local grocery. In another case, an Audi A3 was written off when an 18-year-old member of staff, who had no insurance, totaled it while speeding on the freeway. Airparks blames a series of "highly unusual system errors" for the incident. The simple explanation: It shares office and parking space with Green Motion, a car rental company.

Nosing out trouble

Parents find new home DARE test

Parents in Maryland who suspect their kids seriously flunked the drug abuse resistance education program can now order a retest from the nonprofit group Dogs Finding Drugs, whose canines can detect even trace amounts of narcotics within seconds. Owner Anne Willis says demand is high, even at a rate of about $200 an hour. Dogs Finding Drugs will not confiscate anything, nor does it notify police. Still, kids who are busted appear to disapprove of the group. So does Elizabeth Robertson of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, who says parents should talk to their children about potential drug problems rather than hiring a drug-sniffing dog.

Compiled from Times wire services and other sources.

The skinny: 1,810-pound Wis. pumpkin sets Guinness world record 10/21/10 [Last modified: Thursday, October 21, 2010 8:57pm]

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