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The skinny

The skinny: Lobster shells valuable for golf balls, plant pots

green golfer

Birdie the hole? heck, now you can lobster it

Lobsters aren't just for eating anymore. The shells from Maine's signature seafood are being used to manufacture decorative tiles, trivets and drinking-glass coasters. Work is under way to utilize them in countertops and tabletops. And at the University of Maine, a professor has developed prototypes of biodegradable golf balls and plant pots made out of ground-up lobster shells. David Neivandt, a professor of chemical and biological engineering, and one of his students, Alex Caddell, developed a golf ball using ground-up lobster shells mixed with a glue-like substance for its core. The shell is also made out of naturally derived biodegradable material, but they aren't giving specifics because they don't want to give away any secrets. The ball is the same size and weight as a standard golf ball and nearly hits like the real thing but is intended for use on cruise ships or at driving ranges on lakes or the ocean.

immigration issue

There's no app for that, smugglers

An iPhone game that allows users to drive a truck full of immigrants through the desert while trying to prevent them from getting thrown out of the vehicle has been rejected by Apple. Owlchemy Labs, the Boston company that developed Smuggle Truck: Operation Immigration, said the Apple App Store turned down the game three weeks ago, but did accept its Snuggle Truck app, a game that allows players to "bring cute animals from the wilderness to the comfort of a zoo."

Building Feud

Split-level couple are officially split

A feuding New York City couple who built a wall through their house because neither would give it up, has finally been granted a divorce. A judge had ordered Simon and Chana Taub to build the wall in their brownstone, because both refused to move. At the time, New York state didn't allow the speedy dissolution of a marriage without proof that one spouse was at fault, and neither of the Taubs would admit to fault. The couple filed for divorce in 2005, but a jury rejected it. The judge on Wednesday also ordered the Taubs to sell their brownstone and two other homes and divide the proceeds. Chana Taub plans to appeal.

sex in the city

Town limits hen, rooster encounters

A New Jersey town has adopted an ordinance that regulates when chickens and roosters can hook up in backyard henhouses. Roosters must show they're disease-free and they had better not crow about their conquests. Hopewell Township residents can have up to a half-dozen hens on half-acre lots. Roosters would be allowed only 10 days a year for fertilization purposes. Mature roosters are not allowed because they're too noisy. Any roosters that crow too long can be banned from the property for two years.

Compiled from Times wires.

The skinny: Lobster shells valuable for golf balls, plant pots 04/28/11 [Last modified: Thursday, April 28, 2011 8:42pm]
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