CDC says boys should get HPV vaccine

CDC says boys should get hpv vaccine

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has endorsed the recommendation of a federal advisory panel that boys be routinely vaccinated against infection with human papillomavirus, or HPV. Since 2006, the vaccine has been recommended for girls and young women, largely because HPV causes cervical cancer. But until October, public health authorities had not expressly encouraged the vaccine for boys, saying only that they "could" receive it to protect against genital warts and certain cancers and to help prevent the spread of HPV. In a new immunization schedule published last week in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the CDC backed the panel's recommendation for HPV vaccinations for boys age 11 to 12 and catchup vaccinations for those 13 to 21. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the country.

LOS ANGELES

Entire staff at school to change

Los Angeles Unified School District superintendent John Deasy told parents Monday evening that the district is replacing the entire staff of Miramonte Elementary School in the wake of the arrests last week of two teachers on lewd conduct charges. The move is intended to build confidence among the many families who have lost faith in their neighborhood elementary school. More than a quarter of students did not show up for classes on Monday.

WASHINGTON

Obama to reveal education plan

President Barack Obama will use the backdrop of a White House science fair Tuesday to highlight a nationwide shortage of math and science teachers and unveil a plan to invest $100 million to help train 100,000 new educators over the next decade. Under his proposal, Obama will ask Congress for $80 million to support new Department of Education grants for colleges that provide innovative teacher-training programs. The president also is set to announce a $22 million commitment from private companies that will support the effort, according to White House officials.

CHICAGO

Man pleads guilty to terror charge

A Chicago cab driver of Pakistani descent pleaded guilty Monday in federal court in Chicago to sending cash to a Kashmiri nationalist group that had ties to al-Qaida. Raja Lahrasib Khan, 59, pleaded guilty to a single count of providing material support to a foreign terrorist organization. U.S. District Judge James Zagel said he intended to sentence Khan to five to eight years in prison as part of his plea deal. Khan, who agreed to cooperate, had faced up to life imprisonment.

Elsewhere

Philippines: Rescuers tried to reach dozens of people trapped under houses on Negros Island after a strong earthquake Monday. At least 13 people were killed and 40 are believed missing.

Times wires

CDC says boys should get HPV vaccine

02/06/12 [Last modified: Monday, February 6, 2012 11:30pm]

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