Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Dances With Dirt race in Pasco promises mud, brambles and a river

DADE CITY

Race promises mud, brambles and a river

Dances With Dirt, an extreme running event through the Green Swamp, will return March 9 to Withlacoochee River Park. Organizers expect more than 600 runners for the event, which includes 10K, half marathon, full marathon, 50K and 50 Mile individual ultra-marathons, as well as the five-person 50-mile relay. The rugged courses include trails, uncleared "bushwhack" paths and some river crossings. After the races, runners will enjoy a barbecue party and the presentation of swamp style awards. For information or to register, visit dwdgreenswamp.com.

ST. LEO

Speakers to talk on interfaith rescues

The Center of Catholic-Jewish Studies at Saint Leo University is working with the Franciscan Center of Tampa to present a three-part speaker series in 2013 titled "To Save One Life: Catholic and Muslim Rescuers of Jews in the Holocaust." The series consists of talks by three distinguished speakers, and each will present at both Saint Leo University and at the Franciscan Center, to reach the broadest possible audience. Admission is free and open to the public. Psychologist and author Eva Fogelman will speak on "The Motivations of Rescuers During the Holocaust" from 1:30 to 3 p.m. Jan. 29 in the Student Community Center at Saint Leo University, 33701 State Road 52 (4 miles east of Interstate 75). She will present again at 5:30 p.m. Jan. 30 at the Franciscan Center, 3010 N Perry Ave., Tampa. In February, Father André Cirino will present "Rescuers of Jews in the Italian City of Assisi During the Holocaust" from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Feb. 5 at Saint Leo; and 5:30 p.m. Feb. 6 at the Franciscan Center. In March, religious studies scholar Mehnaz Afridi of Manhattan College will discuss "Muslim Rescuers of Jews During the Holocaust" from 1:30 to 3 p.m. March 19 at Saint Leo; and at 5:30 p.m. March 20 at the Franciscan Center. For information, contact Abraham Peck, executive director of the Center of Catholic-Jewish Studies at Saint Leo, at (352) 588-7298, or abraham.peck@saintleo.edu.

WESLEY CHAPEL

Volunteers needed for Arts Fest

The eighth annual Suncoast Arts Fest needs volunteers for set-up and take-down, hospitality, booth-sitting, floaters, the information booth, youth art areas and the One-Mile Fun Run. Volunteers will receive a complimentary art show T-shirt. The fest will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Jan. 19 and from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Jan. 20, at the Shops at Wiregrass, 28211 Paseo Drive, Suite 100, Wesley Chapel. To volunteer, visit www.suncoastartsfest.com or email volunteer coordinator Carolyn Francis at artladee2002@yahoo.com.

Dances With Dirt race in Pasco promises mud, brambles and a river 12/21/12 [Last modified: Friday, December 21, 2012 8:34pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Under Republican health care bill, Florida must make up $7.5 billion

    Markets

    If a Senate bill called the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 becomes law, Florida's government would need to make up about $7.5 billion to maintain its current health care system. The bill, which is one of the Republican Party's long-promised answers to the Affordable Care Act imposes a cap on funding per enrollee …

    Florida would need to cover $7.5 billion to keep its health care program under the Republican-proposed Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.  [Times file photo]
  2. Minors also a training ground for umpires with big-league dreams

    The Heater

    Umpire Tom Fornarola, 23, left, and Taylor Payne, 24, facing, talk before the start of the Gulf Coast League game between the New York Yankees and the Detroit Tigers at the Tigertown complex in Lakeland, Fla. on Wednesday, July 5, 2017.
  3. In Florida, nation's only lightning center closes after DARPA cuts funding (w/video)

    Environment

    University of Florida professor Martin Uman usually spends much of this summer at an old Army base about an hour northeast of Gainesville, shooting rockets at thunderclouds, then measuring the bright flashes of lightning that followed.

    Rocket-and-wire triggered lightning at the University of Florida's International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, which recently lost federal funding. A rocket trailing a grounded wire is launched toward an active thunderstorm at the ICLRT. One launch is from a tower, one from ground. When the wire is about as high as the Empire State Building, lightning is induced to strike the top of the wire, much as it strikes tall objects like the ESB. Interestingly, the cloud charge source is about 3 miles high, so a 300 yard-long wire can cause a 3 mile or more long lightning.  After that, there are several normal tortuous strokes ( downward leaders from the cloud charge/upward return strokes) which can be seen as the wind blows the individual strokes to the right. The time between strokes is about 50 thousands of a second. Between some strokes, continuing current can be seen. Continuing current is what generally starts forest fires. [Photo by Dr. Dustin Hill]
  4. Editorial: Reasonable clarity on gambling in Florida

    Editorials

    Gambling expansion strategies — and misfires — are nearly an annual ritual in Florida. There were the eight counties that voted to allow slot machines but were blocked by the Florida Supreme Court. There was the governor's $3 billion deal with the Seminole Tribe in 2015 that was never approved by the …

    Gov. Rick Scott agreed to a much simpler deal with the Seminole Tribe that embraces the status quo instead of expansion. And that’s a good thing.
  5. Amid U.S. real estate buying binge by foreign investors, Florida remains first choice

    Real Estate

    Foreign investment in U.S. residential real estate recently skyrocketed to a new high with nearly half of all foreign sales happening in Florida, California and Texas.

    A National Association of Realtors annual survey found record volume and activity by foreign buyers of U.S. real estate. Florida had the highest foreign investment activity, followed by California and Texas. [National Association of Realtors]