Make us your home page
Instagram

Today’s top headlines delivered to you daily.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Florida briefs: Motorcyclist killed in Lakeland

LAKELAND

Motorcyclist dies after red-light crash

A motorcyclist is dead in Central Florida after running a red light and colliding with a sports utility vehicle.

The Lakeland police department announced the 2004 Suzuki motorcycle struck a 2000 Jeep Cherokee SUV in the intersection of South Florida Avenue and Lime Street shortly after 2 a.m. Saturday. The motorcyclist was pronounced dead at the scene.

The ensuing investigation revealed that the motorcycle was reported stolen from Kissimmee in December.

Peter Nelson of Tampa was driving the Cherokee and was taken to the hospital with non-life threatening injuries.

MIAMI

Anti-crime official eats paper in court

A Crime Stoppers administrator was found in contempt of court after eating a piece of paper a Miami-Dade County circuit judge ordered turned over.

The Miami Herald reported that Judge Victoria R. Brennan ordered Richard Masten to turn over information gained from a tip, but Crime Stoppers policy guarantees anonymity. Masten, who oversees the nonprofit organization, refused and ate the paper in court, saying the identity of the tipster could be determined.

The information concerned a case in which a Hialeah woman named Lissette Alvarez, 45, was arrested on a cocaine possession charge. Alvarez's lawyer, Jean Michel D'Escoubet, said the information is important to the defense and they are not interested in the identity of the tipster.

Masten faces 14 days in jail if he doesn't cooperate by Thursday.

Hispanic TV anchor honored for career

The National Association of Broadcasters is honoring Univision and Fusion anchor Jorge Ramos for nearly three decades of distinguished service.

Ramos started at Univision in 1986. He co-hosts the network's nightly news program with Maria Elena Salinas, as well as a Sunday weekly affairs program.

Times wires

TALLAHASSEE

Changes planned for Board of Pharmacy

The Florida Legislature is considering a change in the composition of the state's Board of Pharmacy. The change would reduce the number of at-large pharmacists on the board and increase the number of pharmacists who represent community and corporate drugstores.

The measure would raise from one to three the number of seats reserved for pharmacists representing both small and large chain stores. The number of at-large spots would be reduced from five to one. Two people would continue serving as consumer representatives.

The board is appointed by the governor and meets every other month, hearing issues that include the licensing of new pharmacists and technicians, disciplinary cases and other issues.

Board members are appointed by the governor and confirmed by the Senate.

FORT LAUDERDALE

Adoptive families to get free park passes

More than 15,000 foster and adoptive children and their families are getting free passes to Florida's state parks.

First lady Ann Scott will visit Hugh Taylor Birch State Park in Fort Lauderdale on Monday to promote the partnership between the Department of Children and Families and the Department of Environmental Protection. The event will also include presentations by park staff and a guided nature trail walk.

Each year, thousands of children and their families are able to visit Florida's 171 state parks and trails for free.

Times wires

Florida briefs: Motorcyclist killed in Lakeland 03/15/14 [Last modified: Saturday, March 15, 2014 8:06pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Under Republican health care bill, Florida must make up $7.5 billion

    Markets

    If a Senate bill called the Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017 becomes law, Florida's government would need to make up about $7.5 billion to maintain its current health care system. The bill, which is one of the Republican Party's long-promised answers to the Affordable Care Act imposes a cap on funding per enrollee …

    Florida would need to cover $7.5 billion to keep its health care program under the Republican-proposed Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017.  [Times file photo]
  2. Minors also a training ground for umpires with big-league dreams

    The Heater

    Umpire Tom Fornarola, 23, left, and Taylor Payne, 24, facing, talk before the start of the Gulf Coast League game between the New York Yankees and the Detroit Tigers at the Tigertown complex in Lakeland, Fla. on Wednesday, July 5, 2017.
  3. In Florida, nation's only lightning center closes after DARPA cuts funding (w/video)

    Environment

    University of Florida professor Martin Uman usually spends much of this summer at an old Army base about an hour northeast of Gainesville, shooting rockets at thunderclouds, then measuring the bright flashes of lightning that followed.

    Rocket-and-wire triggered lightning at the University of Florida's International Center for Lightning Research and Testing, which recently lost federal funding. A rocket trailing a grounded wire is launched toward an active thunderstorm at the ICLRT. One launch is from a tower, one from ground. When the wire is about as high as the Empire State Building, lightning is induced to strike the top of the wire, much as it strikes tall objects like the ESB. Interestingly, the cloud charge source is about 3 miles high, so a 300 yard-long wire can cause a 3 mile or more long lightning.  After that, there are several normal tortuous strokes ( downward leaders from the cloud charge/upward return strokes) which can be seen as the wind blows the individual strokes to the right. The time between strokes is about 50 thousands of a second. Between some strokes, continuing current can be seen. Continuing current is what generally starts forest fires. [Photo by Dr. Dustin Hill]
  4. Editorial: Reasonable clarity on gambling in Florida

    Editorials

    Gambling expansion strategies — and misfires — are nearly an annual ritual in Florida. There were the eight counties that voted to allow slot machines but were blocked by the Florida Supreme Court. There was the governor's $3 billion deal with the Seminole Tribe in 2015 that was never approved by the …

    Gov. Rick Scott agreed to a much simpler deal with the Seminole Tribe that embraces the status quo instead of expansion. And that’s a good thing.
  5. Amid U.S. real estate buying binge by foreign investors, Florida remains first choice

    Real Estate

    Foreign investment in U.S. residential real estate recently skyrocketed to a new high with nearly half of all foreign sales happening in Florida, California and Texas.

    A National Association of Realtors annual survey found record volume and activity by foreign buyers of U.S. real estate. Florida had the highest foreign investment activity, followed by California and Texas. [National Association of Realtors]