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Hernando County residents invited to show off plants at fair

BROOKSVILLE

Show off prized plants at Hernando County Fair

Hernando County residents are invited to show off their prized plants at the horticulture show during the Hernando County Fair, which begins Friday and runs through April 13 at the fairgrounds, 6436 Broad St. The contest is open to adults as well as youth enrolled in a Hernando 4-H/FFA or school program. Entries will be accepted only between 4 and 7 p.m. Thursday. Plants must remain on display during the fair and must be picked up between 1:30 and 4 p.m. April 14. All youth exhibitors must provide a self-addressed, stamped envelope with their entry form. All exhibitors will receive a one-day pass to the fair at the exhibit drop-off. For more information or complete rules, stop by the Hernando County Cooperative Extension Service at 1653 Blaise Drive or call (352) 754-4433.

Class of '63 reunion Saturday

The Hernando High School Class of 1963 has its 50th reunion from 6 to 10 p.m. Saturday at Brooksville Country Club at Majestic Oaks, 23446 Links Drive, east of U.S. 41. Other classes are welcome. Reservations required. For details and reservations, call Pam Kinnear Whitehead at (352) 596-9944.

SPRING HILL

Sponsor, get tickets for event

The Arc Nature Coast is seeking sponsors and selling tickets for its Flapper Dapper Hurricane Hoopla from 7:30 to 11:30 p.m. April 20 at the Arc's Education Center and Regional Evacuation Center, 6495 Mariner Blvd. Sponsorships range from $250 to $5,000 and include benefits such as tickets and promotional opportunities. Donations of raffle items and in-kind contributions are also needed. The event is open to the public, but a limited number of tickets will be sold. The cost is $35. For details, tickets or sponsorships, call Nancy Stubbs at (352) 544-2322, ext. 109. Visit thearc-naturecoast.org.

Hernando County residents invited to show off plants at fair 03/30/13 [Last modified: Saturday, March 30, 2013 11:36am]
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