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North Pinellas History | A look back

July 6, 1925: Visitors get hospitable welcome on Caladesi

time for a treat: Employees of Turner’s Ice Cream Parlor in Clearwater stand ready to take customers’ orders in this photograph from the early 1900s. The ice cream parlor was on the north side of Cleveland Street, between Osceola and Fort Harrison avenues. Customers could get their ice cream to go, or they could enjoy it while seated at the counter or at one of the tables. 

Courtesy of Mike Sanders

time for a treat: Employees of Turner’s Ice Cream Parlor in Clearwater stand ready to take customers’ orders in this photograph from the early 1900s. The ice cream parlor was on the north side of Cleveland Street, between Osceola and Fort Harrison avenues. Customers could get their ice cream to go, or they could enjoy it while seated at the counter or at one of the tables. 

Publicity regarding Hog Island, or Caladesi, as it should be called, according to the early Spanish explorers, has caused an increase in the number of visitors to the key north of Big Pass.

Henry Scharrer, who lives on Caladesi and, some say, rules the island, has gained a reputation as a man who does not care for visitors, but he has achieved such fame only because he does not relish calls from people who would try to buy his home, spoil his beloved key or attempt to drive him away from his island kingdom.

A small party of journalists from Clearwater sailed over to Caladesi on Sunday morning.

They did not go in a noisy motorboat that would have scared the fish out of the bayou where Scharrer keeps his boats, but came alongside his little dock quietly and in good order. They were cordially invited to survey the key.

Instead of being an outlaw with a ready gun, Scharrer was found to be hospitable.

He conducted the visitors about his broad acres and pointed out the fauna and flora, Indian mounds, old earthworks and other curiosities.

July 11, 1925

Appendectomy performed on ship

Suddenly attacked by appendicitis while on board a ship en route to Europe, John Sam Wells, son of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Wells of Clearwater, was forced to undergo an operation in mid ocean, according to a report published in the Danville (Ky.) Messenger.

Young Wells left with the party of Professor Henry Meier a short time ago for a tour of continental Europe. While he was on the ship, appendicitis developed in such a serious state that the ship's surgeon declared an operation imperative.

The ship was brought to a standstill, and the operation was successful.

The news was brought to the Danville folk through a cablegram that reported that many in the professor's party have been seasick due to extraordinarily rough seas.

The many Clearwater friends of the younger Wells will regret to learn of his illness. He will probably return home when he is able and not go on with the party tour.

Wells graduated from Center College last June and formerly lived in Danville.

July 7, 1925

Central High School struck by lightning

CLEARWATER — During a major electrical storm that struck Clearwater late Monday afternoon, lightning struck the new Central High School on Greenwood Avenue.

The bolt hit the steel flagpole on the building, which was closed at the time.

An investigation showed that the cornice along the front of the schoolhouse had been shattered, and some smoke arose from the roof.

The extent of the damage to the interior of the structure could not be ascertained, as police Chief Powledge was unable to secure a key that would unlock any of the doors.

Rain was falling in torrents, and after waiting to see that the building was not on fire, police departed.

The same lightning flash that struck the high school made such a loud detonation that occupants of businesses along Garden Avenue hurried to the street, thinking that their buildings had suffered.

Electric service was interrupted for a few minutes during the worst of the storm.

Need of additional storm sewers is being clearly shown by the heavy rains, which come nearly every afternoon.

These rains have interfered with digging foundations for new buildings, and there have been stoppages.

July 20, 1937

Commissioners adopt liquor ordinance

CLEARWATER — Armed with new power from recent legislation, the City Commission last night adopted on first reading a liquor ordinance hoisting the municipal tax on bars and dispensaries of all alcoholic beverages.

Clearwater is following the lead of other municipalities throughout the state. The new tax will be almost twice as much as the current tax.

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A look back at the events, people and places that made North Pinellas the unique place that it is. The information is compiled from past editions of the St. Petersburg Times.

July 6, 1925: Visitors get hospitable welcome on Caladesi 07/08/09 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 8, 2009 4:52pm]

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