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Largo events calendar, Feb. 1 - 3

1 TOday

Family fun: Highland Recreation Complex, 400 Highland Ave. NE, Largo offers programs, classes and special events for nearly every recreational interest. It features both indoor and outdoor facilities, a gym, a skate park and Highland Family Aquatics Center, with the tallest municipal water slide in Pinellas County. Hours are 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon. through Fri., 8 a.m.-9.p.m. Saturday, and noon-6 p.m. Sunday. Call (727) 518-3016.

Enjoy nature: Largo Central Park is a beautiful, 70-acre park located at 101 Central Park Drive. Includes picnic pavilions, restroom facilities and James S. Miles & Richard A. Leandri Military Court of Honor and Rainbow Rotary Playground, one of the only playgrounds in the bay area completely accessible to disabled users. Open 5 a.m.-11 p.m. daily. Call (727) 586-7415 for rental information.

Crossroads Farmers Market: 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the corner of Belcher and Curlew roads, Palm Harbor. Find fresh produce, seafood, spices, cheese, honey, jewelry, clothing and unique gifts. Call (727) 724-3054 or (727) 787-4700.

Highwaymen event and exhibit: Many of the 26 original artists known as "The Highwaymen" will meet with the public to share their traditions and painting techniques 1-5 p.m. at the Safety Harbor Museum of Regional History, 329 Bayshore Blvd. S. Admission $5. Call (727) 726-1668 or visit www.safetyharbormuseum.org.

Election history: A comprehensive collection of American presidential election items are on display through June at the Dunedin Historical Museum, 349 Main St. Includes vintage voting machines and an interactive area. Call (727) 736-1176.

2 moNday

Spotlight series: The Largo Lions Club presents the Lowe Family in a high-energy, fast-paced show of music, song and dance at 2 and 7 p.m. at the Largo Cultural Center, 105 Central Park Drive. Tickets $20; $17 per person in groups of 10 or more. Call (727) 587-6793.

Airline club: United Airlines Retirees and Soon to Be's will meet at 10 a.m. at Tiffany's Restaurant, 35000 Highway 19 N, Palm Harbor. Call Ken Wilson at (727) 443-7060.

Make jewelry: Jodi Kaltenbacher will teach jewelry-making at 11 a.m. Monday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Golda Meir/Kent Jewish Center, 1950 Virginia Ave., Clearwater. $10 per class, plus cost of materials. To register call (727) 736-1494.

Audubon Society meeting: Susan Cerulean, Florida writer, naturalist and activist will be the special guest of the Clearwater Audubon Society at its monthly meeting at 7:30 p.m. Monday at Moccasin Lake Nature Park, 2750 Park Trail Lane, Clearwater. Call (727) 462-6024.

In harmony: The Florida Suncoast Men's Barbershop Chorus is expanding its membership and looking for tenors, leads, baritones and basses who enjoy singing four-part barbershop harmony. The group meets at 6:30 p.m. every Monday at Crossroads Christian Church, 1645 Seminole Blvd., Largo. Call Clyde at (727) 736-7999 or visit www.suncoastchorus.com.

3 Tuesday

Pong to XBox: "Video Stuff," an exhibit of video gaming and its history, will be on display from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday until the end of May at the Dunedin Historical Museum, 349 Main St. Admission $2. Call (727) 736-1176 or visit dunedinmuseum.org.

Luncheon meeting: The Welcome Newcomer Club will meet for an 11:30 a.m. luncheon at Crescent Oaks Country Club, 3300 Crescent Oaks Blvd., Tarpon Springs. A representative of the Haven will speak. Call (727) 517-2423, (727) 536-0231 or visit newcomersofpinellas.org.

Tax help: AARP volunteers will offer free tax counseling and preparation of 2008 federal income tax returns 3-7 p.m. Tuesdays and 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. Wednesdays through April 15 at Oldsmar Public Library, 400 St. Petersburg Drive E. Photo ID and Social Security card required. Call (813) 749-1181.

Dinner dance: Indulge your continental tastes with a pasta dinner and dance from 5 to 8:30 p.m. every Tuesday at the Italian American Club of Greater Clearwater, 200 McMullen Booth Road. $7 members, $9 nonmembers. The club also hosts dinner and dancing every other Saturday from 6-10 p.m. $13 members, $16 nonmembers. Call (727)791-8698.

Speech, speech: The Donaghue-Dunedin Toastmasters Club meets 7-8:30 p.m. every Tuesday at Unity Community Church, 1316 Bayshore Blvd., Dunedin. Individuals interested in becoming better public speakers are invited to attend. Call Sue Gow at (727) 733-5409.

Unique gift: Give your sweetheart a "singing valentine" delivered by singers from the Greater Pinellas Chapter of the Barbershop Harmony Society, along with a red silk rose and parchment scroll. Cost is $50. This fundraising event supports local school music programs through the Barbershop Harmony Foundation. Call (727) 586-4817 for deliveries north of Clearwater; for deliveries to the south call (727) 397-5098 or (727) 786-1739.

Lance A. Rothstein | Times (2007)

Tim Marchand, left, playing tenor drum and Julie Wong, right, playing bagpipe, perform alongside other members of the City of Dunedin Pipe Band at the Zephyrhills Celtic Festival in 2007.

1 TOday

Concert in the park: The Dunedin Pipe Band will give a concert at 1:30 p.m. in Pioneer Park, at Main Street and Douglas Avenue. Free. Bring seating. Call (727) 733-6240.

Largo events calendar, Feb. 1 - 3 01/31/09 [Last modified: Saturday, January 31, 2009 3:30am]
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