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'March for Parks' Pasco County photo contest accepting entries

White Pelicans, a photo by Mark Turnau, is the winner in the Native Florida Birds category of the 2009 “March for Parks” photo contest, sponsored by the West Pasco Audubon Society and Pasco County Parks and Recreation Department.

Photo by Mark Turnau

White Pelicans, a photo by Mark Turnau, is the winner in the Native Florida Birds category of the 2009 “March for Parks” photo contest, sponsored by the West Pasco Audubon Society and Pasco County Parks and Recreation Department.

COUNTYWIDE

Photo contest now accepting entries

Attention photographers: It is once again time to snap some fabulous photos of "Natural Florida" for the "March for Parks" photo contest, sponsored by the West Pasco Audubon Society and Pasco County Parks and Recreation.

The event will be held on March 13 at the Starkey Education Center at J.B. Starkey Wilderness Park, New Port Richey.

The deadline for entries is Feb. 20. Photos can be entered in any of these categories:

1. Native Florida wading birds.

2. Native Florida birds.

3. Plants and flowers in Pasco parks.

4. Scenic Pasco parks.

5. Native Florida reptiles .

6. People in Pasco parks.

7. Native Florida birds of prey.

8. Florida nature in black and white.

9. Sunrise or sunsets.

10. Native Florida animals.

11. Butterflies and other insects.

There is a $4 entry fee for each photo, and contestants may enter as many photos as they wish. Proceeds will go to support the programs and events of the West Pasco Audubon Society. Judging will done by professional photographers and artists.

For information, contest rules and regulations or entry forms visit www.westpascoaudubon.com or e-mail kftracey@verizon.net.

'March for Parks' Pasco County photo contest accepting entries 01/21/10 [Last modified: Thursday, January 21, 2010 8:22pm]
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