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North Pinellas History | A look back

May 7, 1933: Tarpon Springs may enforce old curfew

Fun in the sun: This 1959 photograph shows the city of Clearwater’s float in the Fun ’N Sun parade. Clearwater recently wrapped up its 56th annual Fun ’N Sun Festival. This year’s event included concerts, fundraisers and other activities but not a parade. 

Courtesy of Clearwater Public Library

Fun in the sun: This 1959 photograph shows the city of Clearwater’s float in the Fun ’N Sun parade. Clearwater recently wrapped up its 56th annual Fun ’N Sun Festival. This year’s event included concerts, fundraisers and other activities but not a parade. 

The old city ordinance requiring children of tender age to be off city streets unless accompanied by parents or other adults by a certain hour after sunset will be reviewed by city commissioners at the board's next meeting. The view is that it will again be enforced either in its present form or with some minor changes.

Commissioner Louis Smitzes brought up the curfew ordinance because of a number of accidents that have occurred in the city streets recently.

May 17, 1957

Baptist church to dedicate auditorium

CLEARWATER — Dedication services will be held here Sunday afternoon during an all-day program at the new Lakeview Baptist Church on Lakeview Road east of Missouri Avenue.

Pastor Ray C. Weldon has announced that the Rev. William Hamm, retired Clearwater minister, will give the dedication message at a program beginning at 3 p.m.

The new building is an auditorium, 50 by 70 feet. Next week, the church plans to start construction of a 12-room educational building that also will include kitchen facilities.

May 7, 1933

Bridge over Mullet Creek to be completed

SAFETY HARBOR — Work on the bridge over Mullet Creek near Safety Harbor is nearing completion and will make easy access to the north section of Safety Harbor and to those desiring to go to the school, as it will connect directly with Fifth Avenue. It is reported the city will straw the south approach to the bridge and later when the road bed is worked down will have shell hauled to make travel better.

May 16, 1951

New home awaits capture of alligator

CLEARWATER — Here is a man who hesitates to build a home because of an alligator.

Local contractor Alfred C. Wyllie claims it's no mirage either. He insists that a live and predacious alligator now inhabits the lake on his property bordering Druid Road, and his hesitancy is based on his small son and dog.

"I saw the alligator only the other day," Wyllie said yesterday. "I don't want to build a home there until it is removed because it might get my son or dog. I can't shoot it because it's against the law, so I guess I'll have to call on the state game warden to come and get it."

Wyllie surmised that the gator had made entrance into the lake from Stevenson's Creek. He judged it to be at least 5 feet long.

May 20, 1957

Bandshell bids to be tabulated

CLEARWATER — Tabulation of bids on construction of a bandshell in the Coachman Park area at the bayfront will be presented to city commissioners when they convene for a regular session today at 1:30 p.m. in the City Hall auditorium.

Money for the project will come from an escrow fund set up when Maas Brothers purchased its site on the north side of West Cleveland Street. The fund still contains some $30,000. Previously, it had paid for a paved parking lot next to the bay.

The Clearwater architectural firm of Mallorie and Vasconi designed the bandshell. Eventual seating for almost 6,000 is possible at the site, though the initial accommodations will be more modest.

Also included in the bandshell structure, in addition to the stage, will be restrooms, a backstage area and storage space.

May 17, 1951

New procedure patches WWI wound

SAFETY HARBOR — Isn't medical science wonderful?

"You're mighty right it is," said Jess Preedom of this community yesterday. "And I ought to know."

Two weeks ago, doctors at Bay Pines removed shrapnel fragments that had lodged dangerously close to his spinal column.

"A few years ago, the operation would have been impossible," Preedom declared.

Preedom picked up the shrapnel from an Austrian .77 in World War I. He had an open wound in his back for 33 years, and his right leg was numb.

Now, after his recent operation, the wound is healing, his right leg has recovered its feeling, and he is eagerly looking forward to the day when he can forget bandages altogether.

"I don't know whether I'm in first or second childhood," he said, chuckling. "And frankly, I don't care. The point is I feel wonderful."

Preedom is county service officer, and already he is spending some time in his Clearwater office. He has sent thousands of veterans to Bay Pines since 1946, but this is the first time he has had the opportunity to go himself.

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A look back at the events, people and places that made North Pinellas the unique place that it is. The information is compiled from past editions of the St. Petersburg Times.

May 7, 1933: Tarpon Springs may enforce old curfew 05/06/09 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 6, 2009 8:24pm]

    

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