Pasco's week in words for May 12

The week in words

Editor's note: The following is a recap of the week's news events, in the words of the newsmakers.

"Jeez, it's been three days. I hope I don't die in this car."

Justyn "Jay'' Ambrozia, 90, recalling his thoughts after having spent two days trapped in his car. Ambrozia said he fell and broke a hip and wrist and was unable to get out of the car as it sat in his garage in Trinity.

"This is beyond absurd.'

Ray Gadd, assistant superintendent of schools, expressing anger over a rash of break-ins at Calusa Elementary School in New Port Richey.

"This is all the money we have, and we've got to live within our means. It's going to mean some more hard cuts and it's going to make more people unhappy."

School Board chairwoman Cynthia Armstrong after a unanimous vote to cut 175 positions in an attempt to balance the budget.

"He is a good inmate. What does that show us? What does that mitigate? That he's in solitary and nothing happens?''

Assistant State Attorney Mike Halkitis as he argued that John Sexton should receive the death penalty for killing 94-year-old Ann Perlato in her Port Richey home. A jury agreed with Halkitis.

"He won't even let someone buy him lunch.''

County Commission chairman Ted Schrader regarding outgoing County Administrator John Gallagher. The list of possible replacements was reduced to 10, including one who weathered complaints in Texas that he accepted free tickets to professional sporting events from vendors.

"I understand the people's concerns here, and they can be scary, but I don't believe it's going to be as bad as you think it is."

County Commissioner Kathryn Starkey as the board voted 4-1 to allow a limerock mining operation in Shady Hills, despite concerns from homeowners.

"I told him to shut up, but he didn't want to shut up. I kind of lost my cool."

Eric Davis, explaining why he beat a fellow inmate to death at the Zephyrhills state prison last year. Davis, 34, who murdered his wife in Safety Harbor seven years ago, is accused of killing Joe Hayes, 54, who was serving 99 years for rape, among other crimes.

"I didn't like people. I would just snap at the smallest thing. I didn't like school. I didn't like teachers. ... I didn't care what anybody thought."

Jesse Pope, 18, honored as the turnaround student of the year for Marchman Technical Education Center. Pope said his change of attitude coincided with the birth of his daughter. He went from failing and constantly getting expelled to a 2.6 grade point average. He expects to graduate on time this year.

Pasco's week in words for May 12 05/11/13 [Last modified: Friday, May 10, 2013 7:44pm]

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