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Soda industry sues to block new limits in New York

New York

Soda industry sues to block curbs

The soft-drink industry, joined by several New York City restaurant and business groups, filed a lawsuit Friday that aims to overturn restrictions proposed by Mayor Michael Bloomberg and approved by the Board of Health on sales of large sugary drinks at many city dining locations. The suit, filed in state Supreme Court in Manhattan, contends that the Board of Health did not have the authority to unilaterally ratify the new rules, which limit the size of sugary drinks to 16 ounces or less at restaurants, street carts, and entertainment and sports venues. The rules, approved last month, are scheduled to take effect in March. The mayor's chief spokesman, Marc La Vorgna, called the lawsuit "baseless." City health officials have argued that the plan can help curb runaway obesity rates in the city.

WESTMINSTER, Colo.

Authorities say body is that of missing girl

A body found in a suburban Denver park was identified Friday as that of a missing 10-year-old girl, authorities said.

The body of Jessica Ridgeway was found Wednesday about 7 miles southwest of her home. Authorities said it was not intact, and DNA was used to identify her.

Jessica began a short walk from her home to Witt Elementary School on the morning of Oct. 5 but never arrived. A massive search by hundreds of law enforcement officers did not start until hours later because Jessica's mother works nights and slept through a call from school officials saying Jessica wasn't there.

Investigators have received 1,500 tips from the public, roughly 800 of which have been covered, the FBI said. Authorities also have searched 500 homes.

Elsewhere

MIAMI: Tropical Storm Rafael formed over the eastern Caribbean Sea on Friday, and tropical storm warnings were issued for numerous islands. The National Hurricane Center said the storm was south-southeast of St. Croix.

CHERRY HILL, N.J.: TD Bank is notifying about 260,000 customers from Maine to Florida who may have been affected by a data breach. Company spokeswoman Rebecca Acevedo said Friday that unencrypted backup data tapes were lost in March.

UNITED NATIONS: The Security Council on Friday approved a plan to back an African-led military force to help the Malian army oust Islamic militants who seized the northern half of the country and are turning it into an al-Qaida terrorist hub.

Japan: A senior Chinese diplomat made a secret visit to Tokyo this week to hold talks aimed at defusing tensions between Japan and China over a group of disputed islands, Japan's top government spokesman said Friday.

Times wires

Soda industry sues to block new limits in New York 10/12/12 [Last modified: Friday, October 12, 2012 10:33pm]
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