Clear60° WeatherClear60° Weather

Village Inn moves; Dunedin's locomotive bike rack; Morton Plant Hospital wins design kudos

Dow Sherwood's Village Inn recently relocated to 2525 Gulf-to-Bay Blvd. in Clearwater and is open for business.

"Our lease was up and we decided to take advantage of a larger space conveniently located 1 mile west of the current restaurant," said Paul Walker, president of Dow Sherwood Corp.

The new location has been completely remodeled to reflect Village Inn's "new, deco-modern" style, which the company believes will appeal to baby boomers as well as a younger demographic.

The restaurant has retained all of its former employees and there have been eight new hires.

"Ultimately, we expect to hire a total of about 20 new employees," said Jim Walker, director of operations and vice president of Dow Sherwood.

Store manager Keri Jupin will continue her duties at the new location. "Keri's been with us since she was 16," explained Jim Walker. "She started out as a host and was promoted to relief manager, then night manager and finally store manager."

The restaurant offers breakfast, lunch and dinner. The same Village Inn promotions and specials will continue, including a free piece of pie with any purchase on Pie Rush Wednesdays.

Hours of operation are 6 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and 24 hours Friday and Saturday.

Dow Sherwood opened his first Village Inn restaurant in South Tampa in 1961. Sherwood's grandsons, Paul and Jim, represent the third generation of family members to carry on the legacy as restaurant operators, charitable givers and community activists.

When asked about the involvement of the third generation in a business that's been family-run for the last 50 years, Jim Walker said proudly, "Actually it's our fourth generation, since some of our kids are working for us now."

• • •

The Axelrod Pavilion at Morton Plant Hospital has qualified for a Silver Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Certification. The innovative clinical services and treatment center, built in 2011, encompasses imaging, diagnostic and comprehensive breast cancer services, cancer treatment, patient and family support services and physician offices.

LEED provides guidelines for building owners and operators to identify and implement practical and measurable green building design, construction, operations and maintenance solutions. Factors considered for certification include sustainable site development, water savings, energy efficiency, materials selection and indoor environmental quality.

"The Axelrod Pavilion is an outpatient facility that was designed to maximize comfort, convenience and the quality of care for our patients while also minimizing the impact on the environment," said Kris Hoce, chief operating officer, Morton Plant Hospital. "This accreditation acknowledges the facility's state-of-the-art energy efficiencies and underscores our commitment to controlling operating costs without compromising any aspect of the patient experience."

The four-story, 103,500-square-foot Axelrod Pavilion provides a comfortable, calming environment. The building's interior design includes rock walls and bamboo and incorporates lots of natural light.

Services and programs housed within the Axelrod Pavilion, located at 400 Pinellas St., Clearwater, include the Carlisle Imaging Center, Susan Cheek Needler Breast Center, Comprehensive Breast Care Center of Tampa Bay, Cancer Patient Support Services and the Evelyn Simmers Oncology Resource Library.

• • •

Arc Angels and the Institute for Creative Arts have been selected by the city of Dunedin to design and fabricate a custom bike rack in the shape of an 1890s train locomotive and coal car.

The city put the project out for bids and capped the expenditure at $1,800, leaving the theme to the artist.

Bill Coleman, metal worker and owner of the Institute for Creative Arts, located at 968 Douglas Ave., is currently working on the project with the help of muralist and metal artist Matt Sunderman.

The metal sculpture will be 10 feet long and capable of holding up to 14 bikes. The locomotive will be a replica of the old Orange Belt engines and coal cars that once traveled the west coast of Florida.

"The whole project is about a week's worth of work," estimated Coleman. "We're already halfway done."

The engine will be equipped with a solar panel in the smokestack to supply power to the train's headlamp, which will glow after dark.

According to Coleman, the bike rack will be installed on the northwest corner of Main Street and the Pinellas Trail directly across the street from the Dunedin Historical Museum.

Mail business news to us at Tampa Bay Times, 710 Court St., Clearwater, FL 33756; fax to (727) 441-4119; or email nbeall@tampabay.com.

Village Inn moves; Dunedin's locomotive bike rack; Morton Plant Hospital wins design kudos 06/14/12 [Last modified: Thursday, June 14, 2012 8:13pm]

© 2014 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...