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Berry grower Wishnatzki Farms is now just Wish Farms

The Wishnatzkis of Plant City used the name for 90 years.

SKIP O’ROURKE | Times (2009)

The Wishnatzkis of Plant City used the name for 90 years.

What's more important: family heritage or brand recognition?

Wishnatzki Farms — excuse us, Wish Farms — has chosen the latter.

Plant City-based Wishnatzki, which bills itself as the largest strawberry shipper/grower in Florida, on Tuesday said it has formally changed its name to the more easily pronounceable Wish Farms "to further develop its focus on consumer branding."

The switch ends 90 years and three generations of using the family name. But it wasn't totally unexpected.

In January 2010, Wishnatzki Farms debuted Wish Farms as its new brand for its fresh produce products. It introduced a consumer label featuring Misty the Wish Farms Garden Pixie, replacing the "Wishnatzki Farms" label.

"Building brand recognition amongst consumers is a top priority. Introducing the new label last year was the first step in transitioning from the Wishnatzki name to Wish Farms. It's time to make it official," president Gary Wishnatzki said in a statement. "I'm proud of the organization my grandfather, uncle and father built. We will continue to uphold the traditions, values and quality service that we are known for."

The grower is well-known in Florida, encompassing more than 2,000 acres and shipping about 3.5 million flats of strawberries, 6 million pounds of blueberries and 1 million packages of vegetables a year. It markets produce under Wish Farms, Strawberry Joe and other labels.

Marketing materials, including product labels and purchase orders, will be converted to Wish Farms gradually over the next four months, the company said.

The change is in name only, the company said. Management and ownership are not affected.

Berry grower Wishnatzki Farms is now just Wish Farms 08/02/11 [Last modified: Tuesday, August 2, 2011 8:54pm]
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