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FAA to review Boeing 787, but calls planes safe

On Friday, the Federal Aviation Administration announced it is conducting a review of the design, manufacture and assembly of the Boeing 787, shown being assembled above. The review comes after a series of safety incidents.

Associated Press (2011)

On Friday, the Federal Aviation Administration announced it is conducting a review of the design, manufacture and assembly of the Boeing 787, shown being assembled above. The review comes after a series of safety incidents.

WASHINGTON — The government stepped in Friday to assure the public that Boeing's new 787 "Dreamliner" is safe to fly, even as it launched a comprehensive review to find out what caused a fire, a fuel leak and other worrisome incidents this week.

Despite the incidents, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood declared, "I believe this plane is safe, and I would have absolutely no reservations about boarding one of these planes and taking a flight."

Administrator Michael Huerta of the Federal Aviation Administration said his agency has seen no data suggesting the plane isn't safe, but wanted the review to find out why safety-related incidents were occurring.

The 787 is the aircraftmaker's newest and most technologically advanced airliner, and the company is counting heavily on its success. It relies more than any other modern airliner on electrical signals to help power nearly everything the plane does. It's also the first Boeing plane to use rechargeable lithium ion batteries, which charge faster and can be molded to space-saving shapes compared with other airplane batteries. The plane is made with lightweight composite materials instead of aluminum.

A fire ignited Monday in the battery pack of an auxiliary power unit of a Japan Airlines 787 empty of passengers as the plane sat on the tarmac at Boston's Logan International Airport. It took firefighters 40 minutes to put out the blaze. Also this week, a fuel leak delayed a flight from Boston to Tokyo of another Japan Airlines 787.

On Friday, Japan's All Nippon Airways reported two new cases of problems with the aircraft. ANA spokeswoman Ayumi Kunimatsu said a very small amount of oil was discovered leaking from an engine of a 787 flight from southern Japan's Miyazaki airport to Tokyo.

ANA said that on another flight, to Matsuyama on the island of Shikoku, glass in a cockpit window cracked, and the aircraft was grounded for repairs. ANA said it has no specific plan for inspections and will continue regular operations, though it said it would comply with instructions from the FAA and other authorities.

There is no obvious trend or similarity to the problems, which suggests they are more likely the result of quality control than a design flaw, aviation safety experts said.

"These appear to be isolated incidents," said John Goglia, a former National Transportation Safety Board member.

Some of Boeing's airline customers joined the chorus affirming support for the plane. United Airlines, the only U.S. carrier whose fleet includes the 787, said it has confidence in the airliner and will continue to operate its six 787s as scheduled. Air India said it planned no changes. LOT, the Polish airline, said that it has conducted a series of reviews of all systems in both its Boeing 787s. "All the tests were completed positively — the systems are efficient and work well," the airline said.

FAA to review Boeing 787, but calls planes safe 01/11/13 [Last modified: Friday, January 11, 2013 9:08pm]
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