Monday, September 17, 2018
Business

Senate bill would expand protections for air travelers, require study of airline overbooking

WASHINGTON - Legislation set to be introduced in the Senate on Wednesday would bar airlines from involuntarily removing passengers once they've boarded a flight and eliminate the caps on the compensation they can receive if they are bumped.

The goal the bill's sponsors, Sens. Maggie Hassan, D-N.H., and Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, say, is to prevent a repeat of an incident at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport in which a Kentucky man was forcibly removed from his flight when he refused to give up his seat to accommodate airline crew members.

The Transparency, Improvements, and Compensation to Keep Every Ticketholder Safe (TICKETS) Act also calls for the secretary of transportation to review ticket over-selling practices and consider whether limits should be placed on the number of tickets an airline can sell for a flight.

"The horrifying incident on United Flight 3411 made clear that we need stronger consumer protections for the flying public," Hassan said. "This common-sense legislation will help prevent incidents like that from happening again and help ensure that travelers are treated with greater fairness and respect by the airlines industry. I look forward to working across the aisle to improve traveling conditions for the public."

Added Schatz: "It should go without saying that unless there is a security threat or a safety risk, paying customers should not be forcibly removed from an airplane. But given what happened earlier this month, we need to take action. Our bill will make sure that no matter who you are, passengers are treated with basic respect and dignity."

Airlines, however, would still have the right to remove passengers from a flight if they present a security or health risk.

On Tuesday, Illinois Reps. Jan Schakowsky, D, and Raja Krishnamoorthi, D, introduced a bill that contains some of the same elements of the Hassan-Schatz measure. It too, would bar airlines from forcing passengers who have already checked-in and boarded their flight from being involuntarily removed.

The Senate bill would require airlines to be more upfront about their policies for handling situations in which a flight is overbooked. Such policies would have to be noted on a passenger's flight itinerary and receipt. The legislation also would require airlines to post their policies publicly at each gate.

The measure also addresses the question of how airlines handle seating when they need to accommodate crew members. Under the bill, airline crew who need seats on flights would have to check in 60 minutes prior to departure. United already has changed its policies to require crew members to check in an hour before departure.

The bill already has won the endorsement of the consumer advocacy group Public Citizen.

"The legislation introduced by Senators Hassan and Schatz is a timely and overdue step to reassert the rights and importance of the American consumer in the marketplace and in our democracy," said Lisa Gilbert, vice president of legislative affairs for the nonprofit group.

The measure is co-sponsored by Sens. Ed Markey, D-Mass., Catherine Cortez-Masto, D-Nev., and Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn.

Under current DOT rules, airlines must first ask for volunteers when there are not enough seats on a flight. If travelers are involuntarily bumped they are, with some exceptions, entitled to compensation. It is up to the airlines, however, to determine the amount and form of that compensation. The amount a passenger can receive is capped at $1,350 under DOT's rules. The TICKETS Act would remove that limit.

Hassan and Schatz were among a group of lawmakers who demanded answers from United following the April 9, incident. The airline has not responded.

United CEO Oscar Munoz has promised that the results of an investigation into the matter will be released by the end of the month.

The House is expected to hold hearings into the incident.

Comments
St. Pete condo of Weight Watchers’ Mindy Grossman hits market at nearly $4-million

St. Pete condo of Weight Watchers’ Mindy Grossman hits market at nearly $4-million

ST. PETERSBURG — Mindy Grossman, the former HSN chief who now heads Weight Watchers International, has put her Beach Drive condo on the market at the hefty price of $3.95 million.The three-bedroom, three-and 1/2 bath unit on the 24th floor of Ovation...
Published: 09/17/18
St. Petersburg ranks best in Florida for immigrant inclusivity

St. Petersburg ranks best in Florida for immigrant inclusivity

ST. PETERSBURG — A new study singles out St. Petersburg as the top-ranked city in Florida for promoting the economic well-being of immigrants, but Mayor Rick Kriseman thinks more can be done.Kriseman on Monday celebrated the city’s No. 13 ranking nat...
Published: 09/17/18
Mayo and ketchup mixers, rejoice: Bottled ‘Mayochup’ is coming soon

Mayo and ketchup mixers, rejoice: Bottled ‘Mayochup’ is coming soon

Get your french fries ready: Heinz is set to roll out its newest condiment in the United States very soon.The latest addition to the company’s product lineup is Mayochup. It’s comprised of -- you guessed it -- mayonnaise and ketchup. Back in April, H...
Published: 09/17/18
Report: Florida’s family caregiver laws not so family-friendly

Report: Florida’s family caregiver laws not so family-friendly

Florida may be known for its family-friendly beaches and theme park attractions, but a recent report says not everything in the Sunshine State is as embracing of families. The National Partnership for Women & Families gave Florida a "C-minus" grade f...
Published: 09/17/18
Analysis: The billionaire behind the National Debt Clock has had it with Trump

Analysis: The billionaire behind the National Debt Clock has had it with Trump

When U.S. government debt topped a trillion dollars for the first time in the early 1980s, New York real estate magnate Seymour Durst sent every member of Congress a holiday card that said: "Happy New Year! Your share of the federal debt is $5,000."W...
Published: 09/17/18
Co-founder of Salesforce buys Time magazine for $190 million

Co-founder of Salesforce buys Time magazine for $190 million

WASHINGTON — Time Magazine is being sold by Meredith Corp. to Marc Benioff, a co-founder of Salesforce, and his wife, it was announced Sunday.Meredith announced that it was selling Time magazine for $190 million in cash to Benioff, one of four...
Published: 09/17/18
Kohl’s looks to hire hundreds in Tampa Bay ahead of holidays

Kohl’s looks to hire hundreds in Tampa Bay ahead of holidays

Kohl’s stores in the greater Tampa Bay area are hiring nearly 500 people for seasonal jobs ahead of the holiday shopping season.Several local stores will hold interview events on Sept. 15. Candidates can go to participating stores that day for an int...
Published: 09/14/18
Florida Taco Bell employee refuses to help client who doesn’t speak Spanish

Florida Taco Bell employee refuses to help client who doesn’t speak Spanish

MIAMI - A video of an argument with a Taco Bell employee in Hialeah, Fla., has unleashed a wave of indignation on social media.The incident happened on Wednesday night, when Alexandria Montgomery was trying to place an order - in English - at a Taco ...
Published: 09/14/18
Men’s earnings have fallen since 1970s, Census says

Men’s earnings have fallen since 1970s, Census says

The gender pay gap has begun narrowing over the last four decades — and women’s earnings are now closer to men’s. But that is not only because women are doing better.The trend is also in part because men are earning less. Earnings for men have fallen...
Published: 09/14/18
Electric cars could save Tampa Bay residents $115 per year in fuel

Electric cars could save Tampa Bay residents $115 per year in fuel

Tampa Bay residents commuting with electric cars save an average of $115.38 compared to those with gas-fueled cars, according to a study by Crescent Electric Supply Co. That puts the bay area at No. 3 for electric savings compared to other metro area...
Published: 09/14/18