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U.S. officials defend initial Boeing 787 safety pronouncement

WASHINGTON — Obama administration officials struggled Wednesday to defend their initial statements that the Boeing 787 is safe while promising a transparent inquiry of mishaps involving the aircraft's batteries.

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood stood by his Jan. 11 assertion that the 787, Boeing's newest and most technologically advanced airliner, is safe. At that time, LaHood and the head of the Federal Aviation Administration, Michael Huerta, declared the plane fit to fly despite a battery fire in one plane.

Five days later, after another battery mishap that led to an emergency landing of a 787 in Japan, LaHood and Huerta ordered United, the lone U.S. carrier with 787s, to ground the planes. Authorities in other countries swiftly followed suit.

"On the day we announced the planes were safe, they were," LaHood told reporters at an aviation industry luncheon. He became testy when a reporter pressed him on whether his initial pronouncements had been too hasty.

"I'm not doing these hypothetical look-backs," he said. "We did what we did."

What changed between Jan. 11 and FAA's issuance of a grounding order on Jan. 16 was that a second battery failure occurred on an All Nippon Airways 787 while the airliner was in flight, said Huerta, who joined LaHood at the luncheon. In the first incident, the battery fire occurred in a Japan Airlines 787 that had already landed at Boston's Logan International Airport and was empty of passengers.

"We took the action we took (to ground the planes) because we saw a hazard," Huerta said.

The FAA is working as quickly as possible to find the cause of the problems, Huerta said.

Airplane's battery wasn't overcharged, Japanese investigation finds

The Japanese investigation into a battery that overheated and prompted the emergency landing of a Boeing 787 airliner last week has found no evidence that the battery was overcharged, casting doubts on one recent explanation put forward by Japanese investigators and clouding the U.S. aircraft maker's efforts to get its planes back into the air. Data retrieved from the All Nippon Airways jet suggested that the lithium-ion battery had not been charged beyond its maximum design voltage, 32 volts, said Norihiro Goto, chairman of the Japanese Transport Safety Board. The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration announced similar findings Sunday from its investigation into the lithium-ion battery that caught fire in Boston. — New York Times

U.S. officials defend initial Boeing 787 safety pronouncement 01/23/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 9:40pm]
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