Make us your home page
Instagram

At Japanese video game expo, focus is on future of 3-D

CHIBA, Japan — The Tokyo Game Show has a lot of people wearing dark glasses this year, with the buzz turning 3-D at the annual event that brings together the latest offerings from game machine and software makers.

But despite the fanfare and razzle-dazzle footage, people checking out 3-D games for the PlayStation 3 at Sony's sprawling booth were warned to take the special glasses off immediately if they felt sick or giddy.

And Nintendo, also hoping for a boost from 3-D technology with its planned 3DS handheld that's set to go on sale before April, was conspicuously absent.

The event previewed to reporters and guests Thursday ahead of its opening to the public this weekend. It is expected to draw more than 180,000 people.

Nintendo, the manufacturer of the Wii console and Super Mario games, is skipping the show and planning a separate Sept. 29 event, where the 3DS is expected to take center stage.

"It's like the elephant in the room," said gaming expert Mark MacDonald, executive director at Tokyo-based 8-4 Ltd., which brings Japanese games to the United States.

The show's focus was obviously on 3-D, but the full potential of 3-D for games has yet to be explored, McDonald said.

"It's a young technology in terms of games. People don't know yet how much is too much," he said. "You might start feeling sick, or you just want to see the game and feel I can't see what's going on."

Sony announced that its PlayStation 3 game console will work as a Blu-ray disc player for 3-D movies and music videos, not just 3-D games, with a software update download starting Tuesday.

The free update for movies and other content had been promised for later this year. But the date was moved up to ride on the momentum of 3-D popularity, Sony executive Hiroshi Kawano said.

The reason more time is needed for 3-D gaming to take off for home consoles is that it requires a 3-D TV set, which cost about $2,000 or more. Software makers are waiting for sales of the TVs to increase before investing in developing 3-D games, said Yusuke Tsunoda, an analyst at Tokai Tokyo Securities Co. in Tokyo.

At Japanese video game expo, focus is on future of 3-D 09/16/10 [Last modified: Thursday, September 16, 2010 10:36pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Report slams Pinellas construction licensing agency and leaders

    Local Government

    LARGO — The Pinellas County Construction Licensing Board mismanaged its finances, lacked accountability and disregarded its own rules, according to a scathing report released Wednesday by the county's inspector general.

    Rodney Fischer, the executive director of the Pinellas County Construction Licensing Board, resigned in January.  [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
  2. A meatless burger that tastes like meat? Ciccio Restaurants will serve the Impossible Burger.

    Food & Dining

    TAMPA — The most red-hot hamburger in the nation right now contains no meat.

    Ciccio executive chef Luis Flores prepares an Impossible Burger Wednesday at the Epicurean Hotel Food Theatre in Tampa.
  3. Construction starts on USF medical school, the first piece of Tampa's Water Street project

    Health

    TAMPA — Dozens of workers in hard hats and boots were busy at work at the corner of South Meridian Avenue and Channelside Drive Wednesday morning, signaling the start of construction on the University of South Florida's new Morsani College of Medicine and Heart Institute.

    Construction is underway for the new Morsani College of Medicine and USF Health Heart Institute in downtown Tampa. This view is from atop Amalie Arena, where local officials gathered Wednesday to celebrate the first piece of what will be the new Water Street District. The USF building is expected to open in late 2019. [ALESSANDRA DA PRA  |   Times]
  4. Tampa Bay among top 25 metro areas with fastest growing economies

    Economic Development

    Tampa Bay had the 24th fastest growing economy among 382 metro areas in the country for 2016. According to an analysis by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, Tampa Bay's gross domestic product, or GDP, increased 4.2 percent from 2015 to 2016 to hit $126.2 billion.

    Tampa Bay had the 24th fastest growing economy in the country for 2016. Rentals were one of the areas that contributed to Tampa Bay's GDP growth. Pictured is attorney David Eaton in front of his rental home. 
[SCOTT KEELER | Times]
  5. Tampa Bay cools down to more moderate home price increases

    Real Estate

    The increase in home prices throughout much of the Tampa Bay area is definitely slowing from the torrid rate a year ago.

    This home close to Bayshore Boulevard in Tampa sold for $3.055 million in August, making it Hillsborough County's top sale of the month. [Courtesy of Bredt Cobitz]