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Is an electric car right for you?

Electric cars were popular in early automotive history, but quickly got smoked by their internal-combustion-driven cousins. But in this age of volatile gas prices and climate worries, these clean, quiet vehicles are winning new fans. Advances in technology have improved their range and power. Although existing offerings and the EVs about to come out are comparable to many conventional gasoline-powered vehicles in virtually every aspect but range, they aren't for everyone. Here's what to consider if you are thinking of getting one.

Be prepared to pay more: A glance at the sticker prices says it all. You are going to pay more for the privilege of being able to zip along powered by electrons rather than fossil fuel. The cost of a home charging station adds an expense you don't have with a gasoline car, but it does add convenience.

When you take the purchase price, add in the cost of three years of maintenance, three years of fuel and a home charging station, then back out the expected resale price, a Chevrolet Volt will run almost $9,000 more than a similar-size conventional-engine Hyundai Elantra and about $5,000 more than the current Prius hybrid before sales taxes and registration fees. A Leaf has a lower sticker price and qualifies for more incentives, depending on your state. It will cost about $6,500 more than an Elantra and about $3,500 more than a Prius before taxes and registration fees.

Philosophy or economics: Is it worth the added expense to reduce your dependence on oil? What are you willing to pay to reduce carbon emissions in your neighborhood? The Leaf creates about 1.8 tons of carbon emissions in a year's driving, or about 13,500 miles, according to federal estimates. A Honda Accord spews 6.2 tons of carbon emissions traveling the same distance. If you can keep a Volt — which has a gas engine to kick in and make electricity when the battery runs out — on mostly electric power, you will put up carbon numbers closer to the Leaf.

Think about your drive: Motorists who commute about 40 miles or less, or who have easy access to a workplace charging station, will be able to make better use of an EV because they won't be limited by the shorter range of the vehicles. But even then, be careful. The Toyota Prius Plug-in Hybrid that goes on sale next year will have an all-electric range of only about 13 miles. After that, the gasoline engine starts. People who drive more than 13 to 15 miles a day might be better off buying a conventional hybrid or fuel-efficient gas-powered car and saving the premium they would pay for the plug-in and the expense of a home charging station.

A Nissan Leaf, and some of its rivals hitting the market in the coming months, will go roughly 75 miles or more on one charge. That's enough for a longer commute, but because the Leaf, the Ford Focus Electric and similar cars are pure electric vehicles, there's no backup gas motor to engage and provide a safety net.

Charging into charging: EVs make the most sense for people who can charge at home, and that rules out most apartment and condo dwellers for now. A home charging station is going to set you back about $2,000 and possibly more, depending on the wiring in your home. You will also need to clear out space in your garage to park a car — imagine that!

Know the incentives: Electric vehicles on the market and coming models are expected to qualify for the $7,500 federal tax credit. But various state and other incentives beyond that get tricky, and you need to research the appropriate government agency before you buy.

Next Friday in BayLink: How to get

the most from your car's fuel or charge.

Is an electric car right for you? 10/06/11 [Last modified: Thursday, October 6, 2011 4:30am]
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