Make us your home page
Instagram

Low-speed crashes for midsize cars bring high-priced repairs

DETROIT — None of the six most-popular midsize sedans earned a top rating in bumper safety in the latest crash tests performed by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

The Mazda 6 was the only car to receive an "acceptable" rating — one rating below "good," the top rating — based on the average cost to repair front, rear and corner bumpers following a 6 mph crash.

A 6 mph crash can simulate a common parking accident, such as backing into another vehicle. IIHS rates vehicles on a four-notch scale ranging from "good" to "poor."

Ratings for the Honda Accord and Hyundai Sonata improved one notch to "marginal" from "poor," with the average cost of repairs coming in at $1,133 and $1,265, respectively.

"Consumers buy midsize cars for practical reasons. There's nothing practical about a $1,000-plus repair bill after a minor bump in commuter traffic," said IIHS senior vice president Joe Nolan.

The 2009 Ford Fusion's bumper rating slipped to "poor" from "marginal" in 2007, with the average cost of repair reaching $2,207. Nolan said the car's weaker bumper beams had a big impact on performance.

"The Fusion's bumper buckled, which caused it to underride the test barrier, resulting in twice as much damage as the 2007 model in the rear test," he said.

General Motors' Chevrolet Malibu also received a "poor" ranking, with average report costs hitting $2,329.

The average repair cost is weighted based on repair costs to the vehicle's various bumpers and real-world damage patterns. The full front and rear test results are given double the weight, IIHS said, because crashes that damage those bumpers are twice as likely as corner impacts.

Clunker program rolls on

The Senate passed a $2 billion extension Thursday for the popular "cash for clunkers" program, clearing the legislation for President Barack Obama's signature. The House approved the measure last week. Under cash for clunkers, consumers qualify for up to $4,500 in federal subsidies when they trade for new, more energy-efficient models.

Low-speed crashes for midsize cars bring high-priced repairs 08/06/09 [Last modified: Thursday, August 6, 2009 10:44pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Trigaux: Closing Iron Yard coding school hits area tech hard but leaders talk of options

    Business

    The coming shutdown this fall of the Iron Yard software coding school in downtown St. Petersburg — announced this month as part of a national closing of all 15 Iron Yard locations — remains a shocking event to a Tampa Bay technology community that dreams big of becoming a major player in the Southeast if not …

    In better days last fall, friends and family of graduates at The Iron Yard, based in the Station House in downtown St. Petersburg, applaud during "Demo Day" when grads of the coding school show off their skills. Despite the local success and strong job placement by the coding school, The Iron Yard is closing all of its 15 locations across the country this summer. [LARA CERRI   |   Times]
  2. U.S. economy gathers steam in second quarter

    Business

    WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy revved up this spring after a weak start to the year, fueled by strong consumer spending. But the growth spurt still fell short of the optimistic goals President Donald Trump hopes to achieve through tax cuts and regulatory relief.

    A government report released Friday showed economic output picked up in the second quarter. 
[Associated Press file photo]
  3. Founder of Tampa home sharing platform questions Airbnb, NAACP partnership

    Business

    TAMPA — A Tampa rival to Airbnb, which was launched because of discrimination complaints on the dominant home sharing platform, has concerns about the new partnership between Airbnb and NAACP announced this week.

    Rohan Gilkes poses for a portrait at his home and business headquarters in Tampa. 

Innclusive, a Tampa-based start-up, is a home-sharing platform that focuses on providing a positive traveling experience for minorities. [CHARLIE KAIJO | Times]
  4. Appointments at Port Tampa Bay and Tampa General Medical Group highlight this week's Tampa Bay business Movers & Shakers

    Business

    Government

    Port Tampa Bay announced that Jamal Sowell has been named director of special projects. Sowell, a former member of the U.S.Marine Corps, will support internal, external and special projects, assist the executive team with management oversight and serve as a liaison on a variety of port …

    Port Tampa Bay announced this week that Jamal Sowell has been named director of special projects. [Handout photo]
  5. Drones restrictions coming at Tampa Bay area airports

    Airlines

    Starting Sept. 1, Tampa International Airport officials will be enforcing new height restrictions for drones and other unmanned aircraft systems, according to a press release.

    In this February 2017 file photo, a drone flies in Hanworth Park in west London. Starting Sept. 1, Tampa International Airport officials will be enforcing new height restrictions for drones and other unmanned aircraft systems,
[John Stillwell/PA via AP, File]