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Motorists name their top (and worst) driving songs in insurance.com survey

What's your favorite tune when you're behind the wheel? Journey's Don't Stop Believin' was voted the best song for driving, according to a survey of 2,000 drivers by Insurance.com. "Some people mock the balladeers, but there's no denying Journey has a fan base, given they took two of the top five spots for songs that people enjoy when driving," said Michelle Megna, managing editor of Insurance.com. What's the worst? Who Let the Dogs Out? by the Baha Men.

Top 15 best car music

Don't Stop Believin' by Journey

Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen

You Shook Me All Night Long by AC/DC

Any Way You Want It by Journey

Life is a Highway by Tom Cochrane

Dancing Queen by ABBA

American Girl by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

Don't Stop Till You Get Enough by Michael Jackson

Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen

Fortunate Son by Creedence Clearwater Revival

September by Earth, Wind and Fire

Every Day Is a Winding Road by Sheryl Crow

California Love by 2Pac

Drive My Car by the Beatles

Little Red Corvette by Prince

Top 15 worst car music

Who Let the Dogs Out? by the Baha Men

We Are Never, Ever Getting Back Together by Taylor Swift

Believe by Cher

Feelings by Morris Albert

Papa Don't Preach by Madonna

Firework by Katy Perry

Mambo #5 by Lou Bega

You're Beautiful by James Blunt

Arms Wide Open by Creed

I Will Survive by Gloria Gaynor

Let's Hear It for the Boy by Deniece Williams

Caribbean Queen by Billy Ocean

Maneater by Hall and Oates

We Built This City by Jefferson Starship

Total Eclipse of the Heart by Bonnie Tyler

Motorists name their top (and worst) driving songs in insurance.com survey 01/23/14 [Last modified: Tuesday, January 28, 2014 10:52am]
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