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New car sales remain strong

DETROIT — Americans found plenty of reasons to buy new cars in September, making auto sales a bright spot in the economy for yet another month.

Total U.S. sales rose 13 percent from a year earlier to nearly 1.2 million. If they stayed at that pace, they'd reach 14.9 million this year. Toyota, Honda and Volkswagen posted big gains, while sales by General Motors and Ford were lackluster.

Low interest rates, aging vehicles that need to be replaced and appealing new models are the main drivers of this year's consistently strong sales, said Jessica Caldwell, an analyst for the Edmunds.com automotive website.

"That's a good combination to get people shopping again," Caldwell said. "That's really what sells cars."

Record-high gas prices shifted buyers away from trucks toward smaller cars. Sales rose 40 percent or more for the Chevrolet Cruze, Ford Focus, Toyota Corolla and other compacts.

Here are the factors that drew buyers to dealerships in September:

FINANCING: Low-interest loans are easy to get again, now that banks have loosened lending. New car loans carried an average interest rate of 4.05 percent in September, the second-lowest rate, behind only December 2011, according to Edmunds.com, which started collecting data in 2002. People with good credit can get a 2 percent rate from a bank or credit union.

NEW MODELS: New vehicles always pique buyers' interest, and there are a lot of them hitting the market now, including redesigned versions of big sellers like the Honda Accord, Nissan Altima and Ford Escape. Sales this year have also gotten a boost as Toyota and Honda re-entered the market after the Japanese earthquake.

CONSUMER CONFIDENCE: Consumer confidence, one of the biggest factors influencing car-buying, jumped in September to the highest level since February.

Even though the economy has sputtered all year, auto sales have remained strong, and are expected to reach 14.3 million for the year. That's a healthy jump from the 12.8 million new cars and trucks sold in 2011.

AGING VEHICLES: Many Americans have to buy a new car because their old one is on its last legs. The average age of a car or truck on U.S. roads is approaching a record 11 years. Even people who buy new cars are keeping them for almost six years before getting rid of them, the longest time ever, the Polk research firm said.

"They're sick of looking at them," says Jack Nerad, editorial director of Kelley Blue Book. "A lot of them just become undrivable."

September sales

Here's how major automakers' September U.S. sales compared with September 2011:

Toyota: + 41.5 percent

Volkswagen: + 34 percent

Honda: + 31 percent

Hyundai: +15 percent

Chrysler: + 12 percent

General Motors: + 1.5 percent

Ford: - 0.1 percent

Nissan: - 1 percent

August home prices

A measure of U.S. home prices jumped 4.6 percent in August compared with a year ago, the largest year-over-year increase in more than six years. CoreLogic, a private real estate data provider, also said Tuesday that prices rose 0.3 percent in August from July, the sixth straight monthly gain. Housing prices are rising in most areas, according to CoreLogic. Only 20 large cities out of 100 tracked showed declines in the 12 months ending in August. That compared with 26 in July.





New car sales remain strong 10/02/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 2, 2012 9:04pm]
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