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Vehicle crash test system gets more thorough, harder to ace

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood conducts a news conference Tuesday in Washington on the new vehicle safety rating system.

Associated Press

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood conducts a news conference Tuesday in Washington on the new vehicle safety rating system.

WASHINGTON — New cars and trucks will have to work harder to make the grade in the government's safety ratings program.

The Transportation Department said the upgrades to the 5-Star Safety Rating System will make it more difficult for new vehicles to earn top scores of five stars. Consumers use the so-called "Stars on Cars" system to assess and compare a vehicle's safety value, which is posted on window stickers adorning cars and trucks in dealer lots.

The 2011 BMW 5 Series and a version of the 2011 Hyundai Sonata were the only two vehicles to receive five stars out of an initial testing of 34 vehicles. Most of the vehicles tested received four stars. The department intends to test 21 more vehicles this year.

The Toyota Camry, the best-selling passenger car in the United States, received three stars overall and the compact Nissan Versa got two stars overall, underscoring the challenges of the new system. Camrys from the 2010 model year received five stars in both front and side testing, while 2010 versions of the Versa got four stars in front and side testing.

The program, which evaluates vehicles on front-end and side-impact crashes and rollovers, was started in 1979 and has helped generate interest in safety equipment such as side-impact air bags and antirollover technology. The government decided to revamp it for the 2011 model year because too many vehicles were getting top marks, making it difficult to distinguish the best performers.

"We are raising the bar on safety," Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said. He said the changes would subject vehicles to more rigorous crash tests and help car shoppers "navigate a crowded marketplace with trustworthy and objective safety analysis."

The ratings range from one to five stars, with five stars being the highest and one star being the lowest.

For the first time, the tests will include dummies representing women. The dummies also will collect data about a wider variety of injuries.

Consumers will not be able to compare a score of a new 2011 model year vehicle with results of a 2010 model year vehicle because of the changes. The window sticker affixed to vehicles at dealerships will need to be redesigned and will not include the overall score until the 2012 model year. Vehicles that have not been tested will be listed as "not rated."

fast facts

The new system for crash results

• Adds overall score combining front, side and rollover tests, compares results with average risk of injury and potential for rollover of other vehicles.

• For the first time, includes dummies representing women.

• Takes into account crash-prevention technologies and a new test that simulates a car striking a pole or a tree.

Test results

See how tested vehicles scored at safercar.gov.

Vehicle crash test system gets more thorough, harder to ace 10/05/10 [Last modified: Tuesday, October 5, 2010 10:01pm]
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